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dc.contributor.authorKochut, Annika
dc.contributor.authorDersch, Petra
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-20T08:48:38Zen
dc.date.available2013-06-20T08:48:38Zen
dc.date.issued2013-06en
dc.identifier.citationBacterial invasion factors: Tools for crossing biological barriers and drug delivery? 2013, 84 (2):242-50 Eur J Pharm Biopharmen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1873-3441en
dc.identifier.pmid23207324en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ejpb.2012.11.013en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/294263en
dc.description.abstractThe oral route is the preferential route of drug delivery in humans. However, effective delivery through the gastrointestinal tract is often hampered by the low permeability of the intestinal epithelium. One possibility to overcome this problem is the encapsulation of drugs inside nanoparticulate systems, containing targeting moieties with cell invasive properties. The bioinvasive features of the delivery system could be provided by the attachment of bacterial invasion factors, which promote efficient uptake into host cells and mediate rapid transcytosis of the pathogen through the intestinal epithelium. This review gives an overview of bacterial invasion systems. The molecular structure and function of suitable bacterial invasins, their relative values as targeting agents and possible pitfalls of their use are described. The potential of bioinvasive drug delivery systems is mainly presented on the basis of the well-characterized Yersinia invasin protein, which enters M cells to gain access to subepithelial layers of the gastrointestinal tract, but alternative approaches and future prospects for oral drug delivery are also discussed.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.Ven_GB
dc.titleBacterial invasion factors: Tools for crossing biological barriers and drug delivery?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Molecular Infection Biology, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of pharmaceutics and biopharmaceutics : official journal of Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Pharmazeutische Verfahrenstechnik e.Ven_GB
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T21:54:27Z
html.description.abstractThe oral route is the preferential route of drug delivery in humans. However, effective delivery through the gastrointestinal tract is often hampered by the low permeability of the intestinal epithelium. One possibility to overcome this problem is the encapsulation of drugs inside nanoparticulate systems, containing targeting moieties with cell invasive properties. The bioinvasive features of the delivery system could be provided by the attachment of bacterial invasion factors, which promote efficient uptake into host cells and mediate rapid transcytosis of the pathogen through the intestinal epithelium. This review gives an overview of bacterial invasion systems. The molecular structure and function of suitable bacterial invasins, their relative values as targeting agents and possible pitfalls of their use are described. The potential of bioinvasive drug delivery systems is mainly presented on the basis of the well-characterized Yersinia invasin protein, which enters M cells to gain access to subepithelial layers of the gastrointestinal tract, but alternative approaches and future prospects for oral drug delivery are also discussed.


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