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dc.contributor.authorBadar, Muhammad
dc.contributor.authorLünsdorf, Heinrich
dc.contributor.authorEvertz, Florian
dc.contributor.authorRahim, Muhammad Imran
dc.contributor.authorGlasmacher, Birgit
dc.contributor.authorHauser, Hansjörg
dc.contributor.authorMueller, Peter P
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-08T14:21:38Z
dc.date.available2013-07-08T14:21:38Z
dc.date.issued2013-07
dc.identifier.citationThe formation of an organic coat and the release of corrosion microparticles from metallic magnesium implants. 2013, 9 (7):7580-9 Acta Biomateren_GB
dc.identifier.issn1878-7568
dc.identifier.pmid23518475
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.actbio.2013.03.012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/295487
dc.description.abstractMagnesium alloys have been proposed as prospective degradable implant materials. To elucidate the complex interactions between the corroding implants and the tissue, magnesium implants were analyzed in a mouse model and the response was compared to that induced by Ti and by the resorbable polymer polyglactin, respectively. One month after implantation, distinct traces of corrosion were apparent but the magnesium implants were still intact, whereas resorbable polymeric wound suture implants were already fragmented. Analysis of magnesium implants 2weeks after implantation by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that magnesium, oxygen, calcium and phosphate were present at the implant surface. One month after implantation, the element composition of the outermost layer of the implant was indicative of tissue without detectable levels of magnesium, indicating a protective barrier function of this organic layer. In agreement with this notion, gene expression patterns in the surrounding tissue were highly similar for all implant materials investigated. However, high-resolution imaging using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy revealed magnesium-containing microparticles in the tissue in the proximity of the implant. The release of such corrosion particles may contribute to the accumulation of calcium phosphate in the nearby tissue and to bone conductive activities of magnesium implants.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Acta biomaterialiaen_GB
dc.titleThe formation of an organic coat and the release of corrosion microparticles from metallic magnesium implants.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHelmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstraße 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalActa biomaterialiaen_GB
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T00:05:52Z
html.description.abstractMagnesium alloys have been proposed as prospective degradable implant materials. To elucidate the complex interactions between the corroding implants and the tissue, magnesium implants were analyzed in a mouse model and the response was compared to that induced by Ti and by the resorbable polymer polyglactin, respectively. One month after implantation, distinct traces of corrosion were apparent but the magnesium implants were still intact, whereas resorbable polymeric wound suture implants were already fragmented. Analysis of magnesium implants 2weeks after implantation by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that magnesium, oxygen, calcium and phosphate were present at the implant surface. One month after implantation, the element composition of the outermost layer of the implant was indicative of tissue without detectable levels of magnesium, indicating a protective barrier function of this organic layer. In agreement with this notion, gene expression patterns in the surrounding tissue were highly similar for all implant materials investigated. However, high-resolution imaging using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy revealed magnesium-containing microparticles in the tissue in the proximity of the implant. The release of such corrosion particles may contribute to the accumulation of calcium phosphate in the nearby tissue and to bone conductive activities of magnesium implants.


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