• Atlas of group A streptococcal vaccine candidates compiled using large-scale comparative genomics.

      Davies, Mark R; McIntyre, Liam; Mutreja, Ankur; Lacey, Jake A; Lees, John A; Towers, Rebecca J; Duchêne, Sebastián; Smeesters, Pierre R; Frost, Hannah R; Price, David J; et al. (Nature publishing group(NPG), 2019-05-27)
      Group A Streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) is a bacterial pathogen for which a commercial vaccine for humans is not available. Employing the advantages of high-throughput DNA sequencing technology to vaccine design, we have analyzed 2,083 globally sampled GAS genomes. The global GAS population structure reveals extensive genomic heterogeneity driven by homologous recombination and overlaid with high levels of accessory gene plasticity. We identified the existence of more than 290 clinically associated genomic phylogroups across 22 countries, highlighting challenges in designing vaccines of global utility. To determine vaccine candidate coverage, we investigated all of the previously described GAS candidate antigens for gene carriage and gene sequence heterogeneity. Only 15 of 28 vaccine antigen candidates were found to have both low naturally occurring sequence variation and high (>99%) coverage across this diverse GAS population. This technological platform for vaccine coverage determination is equally applicable to prospective GAS vaccine antigens identified in future studies.
    • Enteric Murine Ganglionitis Induced by Autoimmune CD8 T Cells Mimics Human Gastrointestinal Dysmotility.

      Sanchez-Ruiz, Monica; Brunn, Anna; Montesinos-Rongen, Manuel; Rudroff, Claudia; Hartmann, Melanie; Schlüter, Dirk; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Deckert, Martina; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Elsevier, 2018-12-27)
      Inflammatory bowel diseases frequently cause gastrointestinal dysmotility, suggesting that they may also affect the enteric nervous system. So far, the precise mechanisms that lead to gastrointestinal dysmotility in inflammatory bowel diseases have not been elucidated. To determine the effect of CD8 T cells on gastrointestinal motility, transgenic mice expressing ovalbumin on enteric neurons were generated. In these mice, adoptive transfer of ovalbumin-specific OT-I CD8 T cells induced severe enteric ganglionitis. CD8 T cells homed to submucosal and myenteric plexus neurons, 60% of which were lost, clinically resulting in severely impaired gastrointestinal transition. Anti-interferon-γ treatment rescued neurons by preventing their up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class I antigen, thus preserving gut motility. These preclinical murine data translated well into human gastrointestinal dysmotility. In a series of 30 colonic biopsy specimens from patients with gastrointestinal dysmotility, CD8 T cell-mediated ganglionitis was detected that was followed by severe loss of enteric neurons (74.8%). Together, the preclinical and clinical data support the concept that autoimmune CD8 T cells play an important pathogenetic role in gastrointestinal dysmotility and may destroy enteric neurons.
    • Future Organization of Clinical Research in Germany: The Road to the "German Centre for Digestive Health" (GCDH).

      Manns, Michael P; Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Hannover Medical School (MHH), Hannover, Germany. (2016-12)
    • Impact of Von Willebrand Factor on Bacterial Pathogenesis.

      Steinert, Michael; Ramming, Isabell; Bergmann, Simone; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Frontiers, 2020-09-03)
      Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a mechano-sensitive protein with crucial functions in normal hemostasis, which are strongly dependant on the shear-stress mediated defolding and multimerization of VWF in the blood stream. Apart from bleeding disorders, higher plasma levels of VWF are often associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular diseases. Herein, the disease symptoms are attributed to the inflammatory response of the activated endothelium and share high similarities to the reaction of the host vasculature to systemic infections caused by pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The bacteria recruit circulating VWF, and by binding to immobilized VWF on activated endothelial cells in blood flow, they interfere with the physiological functions of VWF, including platelet recruitment and coagulation. Several bacterial VWF binding proteins have been identified and further characterized by biochemical analyses. Moreover, the development of a combination of sophisticated cell culture systems simulating shear stress levels of the blood flow with microscopic visualization also provided valuable insights into the interaction mechanism between bacteria and VWF-strings. In vivo studies using mouse models of bacterial infection and zebrafish larvae provided evidence that the interaction between bacteria and VWF promotes bacterial attachment, coagulation, and thrombus formation, and thereby contributes to the pathophysiology of severe infectious diseases such as infective endocarditis and bacterial sepsis. This mini-review summarizes the current knowledge of the interaction between bacteria and the mechano-responsive VWF, and corresponding pathophysiological disease symptoms.
    • Irreversible impact of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on human natural killer cell diversity.

      Strunz, Benedikt; Hengst, Julia; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Björkström, Niklas K; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Shared Science org, 2018-07-25)
      Diversity is crucial for the immune system to efficiently combat infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are innate cytotoxic lymphocytes that contribute to the control of viral infections. NK cells were for long thought to be a homogeneous population of cells. However, recent work has instead revealed NK cells to represent a highly diverse population of immune cells where a vast number of subpopulations with distinct characteristics exist across tissues. However, the degree to which a chronic viral infection affects NK cell diversity remains elusive. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is effective in establishing chronic infection in humans. During the last years, new direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAA) have revolutionized treatment of chronic hepatitis C, enabling rapid cure in the majority of patients. This allows us to study the influence of a chronic viral infection and its subsequent elimination on the NK cell compartment with a focus on NK cell diversity. In our recent study (Nat Commun, 9:2275), we show that chronic HCV infection irreversibly impacts human NK cell repertoire diversity.
    • OTUB1 inhibits CNS autoimmunity by preventing IFN-γ-induced hyperactivation of astrocytes.

      Wang, Xu; Mulas, Floriana; Yi, Wenjing; Brunn, Anna; Nishanth, Gopala; Just, Sissy; Waisman, Ari; Brück, Wolfgang; Deckert, Martina; Schlüter, Dirk; et al. (EMBO Press, 2019-04-03)
      Astrocytes are critical regulators of neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Growing evidence indicates that ubiquitination of signaling molecules is an important cell-intrinsic mechanism governing astrocyte function during MS and EAE Here, we identified an upregulation of the deubiquitinase OTU domain, ubiquitin aldehyde binding 1 (OTUB1) in astrocytes during MS and EAE Mice with astrocyte-specific OTUB1 ablation developed more severe EAE due to increased leukocyte accumulation, proinflammatory gene transcription, and demyelination in the spinal cord as compared to control mice. OTUB1-deficient astrocytes were hyperactivated in response to IFN-γ, a fingerprint cytokine of encephalitogenic T cells, and produced more proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines than control astrocytes. Mechanistically, OTUB1 inhibited IFN-γ-induced Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling by K48 deubiquitination and stabilization of the JAK2 inhibitor suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1). Thus, astrocyte-specific OTUB1 is a critical inhibitor of neuroinflammation in CNS autoimmunity.