• Macrophage entrapped silica coated superparamagnetic iron oxide particles for controlled drug release in a 3D cancer model.

      Ullah, Sami; Seidel, Katja; Türkkan, Sibel; Warwas, Dawid Peter; Dubich, Tatyana; Rohde, Manfred; Hauser, Hansjörg; Behrens, Peter; Kirschning, Andreas; Köster, Mario; et al. (2018-12-23)
      Targeted delivery of drugs is a major challenge in treatment of diverse diseases. Systemically administered drugs demand high doses and are accompanied by poor selectivity and side effects on non-target cells. Here, we introduce a new principle for targeted drug delivery. It is based on macrophages as transporters for nanoparticle-coupled drugs as well as controlled release of drugs by hyperthermia mediated disruption of the cargo cells and simultaneous deliberation of nanoparticle-linked drugs. Hyperthermia is induced by an alternating electromagnetic field (AMF) that induces heat from silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). We show proof-of-principle of controlled release by the simultaneous disruption of the cargo cells and the controlled, AMF induced release of a toxin, which was covalently linked to silica-coated SPIONs via a thermo-sensitive linker. Cells that had not been loaded with SPIONs remain unaffected. Moreover, in a 3D co-culture model we demonstrate specific killing of associated tumour cells when employing a ratio as low as 1:40 (SPION-loaded macrophage: tumour cells). Overall, our results demonstrate that AMF induced drug release from macrophage-entrapped nanoparticles is tightly controlled and may be an attractive novel strategy for targeted drug release.
    • MAIT cells are enriched and highly functional in ascites of patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis.

      Niehaus, Christian E; Strunz, Benedikt; Cornillet, Martin; Falk, Christine S; Schnieders, Ansgar; Maasoumy, Benjamin; Hardtke, Svenja; Manns, Michael P; Rm Kraft, Anke; Björkström, Niklas K; et al. (Wiley Online Open, 2020-02-03)
      Patients with advanced liver cirrhosis have an increased susceptibility to infections. As part of the cirrhosis-associated immune dysfunction, mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, that have the capacity to respond towards bacteria, are severely diminished in circulation and liver tissue. However, MAIT cell presence and function in the peritoneal cavity, a common anatomical site for infections in cirrhosis, remain elusive. To study this, matched peripheral blood and ascites fluid were collected from 35 patients with decompensated cirrhosis, with or without spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). MAIT cell phenotype and function were analyzed using high-dimensional flow cytometry and obtained data was compared to blood samples of healthy controls (n=24) and patients with compensated cirrhosis (n=11). We found circulating MAIT cells to be severely decreased in cirrhotic patients as compared to controls. In contrast, in ascites fluid, MAIT cells were significantly increased together with CD14+ CD16+ monocytes, ILCs, and NK cells. This was paralleled by elevated levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in ascites fluid as compared to plasma. Peritoneal MAIT cells displayed an activated tissue-resident phenotype and this was corroborated by increased functional responses following stimulation with E. coli or lL-12 + IL-18 as compared to circulating MAIT cells. During SBP, peritoneal MAIT cell frequencies increased most among all major immune cell subsets, suggestive of active homing of MAIT cells to the site of infection. CONCLUSIONS: Despite severely diminished MAIT cell numbers and impaired phenotype in circulation, peritoneal MAIT cells remain abundant, activated, and highly functional in decompensated cirrhosis and are further enriched in SBP. This suggests that peritoneal MAIT cells could be of interest for immune intervention strategies in patients with decompensated liver cirrhosis and SBP.
    • miR-181a/b-1 controls thymic selection of Treg cells and tunes their suppressive capacity.

      Łyszkiewicz, Marcin; Winter, Samantha J; Witzlau, Katrin; Föhse, Lisa; Brownlie, Rebecca; Puchałka, Jacek; Verheyden, Nikita A; Kunze-Schumacher, Heike; Imelmann, Esther; Blume, Jonas; et al. (PLOS, 2019-03-01)
      The interdependence of selective cues during development of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in the thymus and their suppressive function remains incompletely understood. Here, we analyzed this interdependence by taking advantage of highly dynamic changes in expression of microRNA 181 family members miR-181a-1 and miR-181b-1 (miR-181a/b-1) during late T-cell development with very high levels of expression during thymocyte selection, followed by massive down-regulation in the periphery. Loss of miR-181a/b-1 resulted in inefficient de novo generation of Treg cells in the thymus but simultaneously permitted homeostatic expansion in the periphery in the absence of competition. Modulation of T-cell receptor (TCR) signal strength in vivo indicated that miR-181a/b-1 controlled Treg-cell formation via establishing adequate signaling thresholds. Unexpectedly, miR-181a/b-1-deficient Treg cells displayed elevated suppressive capacity in vivo, in line with elevated levels of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated 4 (CTLA-4) protein, but not mRNA, in thymic and peripheral Treg cells. Therefore, we propose that intrathymic miR-181a/b-1 controls development of Treg cells and imposes a developmental legacy on their peripheral function.
    • More than just a metabolic regulator--elucidation and validation of new targets of PdhR in Escherichia coli.

      Göhler, Anna-Katharina; Kökpinar, Öznur; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Geffers, Robert; Guthke, Reinhard; Rinas, Ursula; Schuster, Stefan; Jahreis, Knut; Kaleta, Christoph; Department of Genetics, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany. (2011)
      The pyruvate dehydrogenase regulator protein (PdhR) of Escherichia coli acts as a transcriptional regulator in a pyruvate dependent manner to control central metabolic fluxes. However, the complete PdhR regulon has not yet been uncovered. To achieve an extended understanding of its gene regulatory network, we combined large-scale network inference and experimental verification of results obtained by a systems biology approach.
    • Nasal DNA methylation profiling of asthma and rhinitis.

      Qi, Cancan; Jiang, Yale; Yang, Ivana V; Forno, Erick; Wang, Ting; Vonk, Judith M; Gehring, Ulrike; Smit, Henriëtte A; Milanzi, Edith B; Carpaij, Orestes A; et al. (2020-01-14)
    • Non-Targeted Mass Isotopolome Analysis Using Stable Isotope Patterns to Identify Metabolic Changes.

      Dudek, Christian-Alexander; Schlicker, Lisa; Hiller, Karsten; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
      Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry can provide an extensive overview of the metabolic state of a biological system. Analysis of raw mass spectrometry data requires powerful data processing software to generate interpretable results. Here we describe a data processing workflow to generate metabolite levels, mass isotopomer distribution, similarity and variability analysis of metabolites in a nontargeted manner, using stable isotope labeling. Using our data analysis software, no bioinformatic or programming background is needed to generate results from raw mass spectrometry data.
    • Novel Cycloheximide Derivatives Targeting the Moonlighting Protein Mip Exhibit Specific Antimicrobial Activity Against Legionella pneumophila.

      Rasch, Janine; Theuerkorn, Martin; Ünal, Can; Heinsohn, Natascha; Tran, Stefan; Fischer, Gunter; Weiwad, Matthias; Steinert, Michael; Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstraße 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2015)
      Macrophage infectivity potentiator (Mip) and Mip-like proteins are virulence factors in a wide range of pathogens including Legionella pneumophila. These proteins belong to the FK506 binding protein (FKBP) family of peptidyl-prolyl-cis/trans-isomerases (PPIases). In L. pneumophila, the PPIase activity of Mip is required for invasion of macrophages, transmigration through an in vitro lung-epithelial barrier, and full virulence in the guinea pig infection model. Additionally, Mip is a moonlighting protein that binds to collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. Here, we describe the development and synthesis of cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties as novel FKBP ligands, and analyze their effect on the viability of L. pneumophila and other bacteria. All compounds efficiently inhibited PPIase activity of the prototypic human FKBP12 as well as Mip with IC50-values as low as 180 nM and 1.7 μM, respectively. Five of these derivatives inhibited the growth of L. pneumophila at concentrations of 30-40 μM, but exhibited no effect on other tested bacterial species indicating a specific spectrum of antibacterial activity. The derivatives carrying a 3,5-dimethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.32), and a 3-ethyladamantan-1-[yl]acetamide substitution (MT_30.51) had the strongest effects in PPIase- and liquid growth assays. MT_30.32 and MT_30.51 were also inhibitory in macrophage infection studies without being cytotoxic. Accordingly, by applying a combinatorial approach, we were able to generate novel, hybrid inhibitors consisting of cycloheximide and adamantane, two known FKBP inhibitors that interact with different parts of the PPIase domain, respectively. Interestingly, despite the proven Mip-inhibitory activity, the viability of a Mip-deficient strain was affected to the same degree as its wild type. Hence, we also propose that cycloheximide derivatives with adamantyl moieties are potent PPIase inhibitors with multiple targets in L. pneumophila.
    • OTUB1 inhibits CNS autoimmunity by preventing IFN-γ-induced hyperactivation of astrocytes.

      Wang, Xu; Mulas, Floriana; Yi, Wenjing; Brunn, Anna; Nishanth, Gopala; Just, Sissy; Waisman, Ari; Brück, Wolfgang; Deckert, Martina; Schlüter, Dirk; et al. (EMBO Press, 2019-04-03)
      Astrocytes are critical regulators of neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Growing evidence indicates that ubiquitination of signaling molecules is an important cell-intrinsic mechanism governing astrocyte function during MS and EAE Here, we identified an upregulation of the deubiquitinase OTU domain, ubiquitin aldehyde binding 1 (OTUB1) in astrocytes during MS and EAE Mice with astrocyte-specific OTUB1 ablation developed more severe EAE due to increased leukocyte accumulation, proinflammatory gene transcription, and demyelination in the spinal cord as compared to control mice. OTUB1-deficient astrocytes were hyperactivated in response to IFN-γ, a fingerprint cytokine of encephalitogenic T cells, and produced more proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines than control astrocytes. Mechanistically, OTUB1 inhibited IFN-γ-induced Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling by K48 deubiquitination and stabilization of the JAK2 inhibitor suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1). Thus, astrocyte-specific OTUB1 is a critical inhibitor of neuroinflammation in CNS autoimmunity.
    • Pathogen-induced ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 bifunctionally shuts off NF-κB and caspase-8-dependent apoptotic cell death.

      Lim, Michelle C C; Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Feige, Michael H; Diezko, Rolf; Buchbinder, Jörn; Backert, Steffen; Schlüter, Dirk; Lavrik, Inna N; Naumann, Michael; et al. (2017-06-02)
      The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori infects more than half of the world's population and is a paradigm for persistent yet asymptomatic infection but increases the risk for chronic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. For successful colonization, H. pylori needs to subvert the host cell death response, which serves to confine pathogen infection by killing infected cells and preventing malignant transformation. Infection of gastric epithelial cells by H. pylori provokes direct and fast activation of the proinflammatory and survival factor NF-κB, which regulates target genes, such as CXCL8, BIRC3 and TNFAIP3. However, it is not known how H. pylori exploits NF-κB activation and suppresses the inflammatory response and host apoptotic cell death, in order to avert the innate immune response and avoid cell loss, and thereby enhance colonization to establish long-term infection. Here we assign for the first time that H. pylori and also Campylobacter jejuni-induced ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 bifunctionally terminates NF-κB activity and negatively regulates apoptotic cell death. Mechanistically, we show that the deubiquitinylase activity of A20 counteracts cullin3-mediated K63-linked ubiquitinylation of procaspase-8, therefore restricting the activity of caspase-8. Interestingly, another inducible NF-κB target gene, the scaffold protein p62, ameliorates the interaction of A20 with procaspase-8. In conclusion, pathogen-induced de novo synthesis of A20 regulates the shut-off of the survival factor NF-κB but, on the other hand, also impedes caspase-8-dependent apoptotic cell death so as to promote the persistence of pathogens.Cell Death and Differentiation advance online publication, 2 June 2017; doi:10.1038/cdd.2017.89.
    • The phenotypes of ATG9, ATG16 and ATG9/16 knock-out mutants imply autophagy-dependent and -independent functions.

      Xiong, Qiuhong; Ünal, Can; Matthias, Jan; Steinert, Michael; Eichinger, Ludwig; Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstraße 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2015-04)
      Macroautophagy is a highly conserved intracellular bulk degradation system of all eukaryotic cells. It is governed by a large number of autophagy proteins (ATGs) and is crucial for many cellular processes. Here, we describe the phenotypes of Dictyostelium discoideum ATG16(-) and ATG9(-)/16(-) cells and compare them to the previously reported ATG9(-) mutant. ATG16 deficiency caused an increase in the expression of several core autophagy genes, among them atg9 and the two atg8 paralogues. The single and double ATG9 and ATG16 knock-out mutants had complex phenotypes and displayed severe and comparable defects in pinocytosis and phagocytosis. Uptake of Legionella pneumophila was reduced. In addition, ATG9(-) and ATG16(-) cells had dramatic defects in autophagy, development and proteasomal activity which were much more severe in the ATG9(-)/16(-) double mutant. Mutant cells showed an increase in poly-ubiquitinated proteins and contained large ubiquitin-positive protein aggregates which partially co-localized with ATG16-GFP in ATG9(-)/16(-) cells. The more severe autophagic, developmental and proteasomal phenotypes of ATG9(-)/16(-) cells imply that ATG9 and ATG16 probably function in parallel in autophagy and have in addition autophagy-independent functions in further cellular processes.
    • PilY1 Promotes Legionella pneumophila Infection of Human Lung Tissue Explants and Contributes to Bacterial Adhesion, Host Cell Invasion, and Twitching Motility.

      Hoppe, Julia; Ünal, Can M; Thiem, Stefanie; Grimpe, Louisa; Goldmann, Torsten; Gaßler, Nikolaus; Richter, Matthias; Shevchuk, Olga; Steinert, Michael; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr.7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2017)
      Legionnaires' disease is an acute fibrinopurulent pneumonia. During infection Legionella pneumophila adheres to the alveolar lining and replicates intracellularly within recruited macrophages. Here we provide a sequence and domain composition analysis of the L. pneumophila PilY1 protein, which has a high homology to PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PilY1 proteins of both pathogens contain a von Willebrand factor A (vWFa) and a C-terminal PilY domain. Using cellular fractionation, we assigned the L. pneumophila PilY1 as an outer membrane protein that is only expressed during the transmissive stationary growth phase. PilY1 contributes to infection of human lung tissue explants (HLTEs). A detailed analysis using THP-1 macrophages and A549 lung epithelial cells revealed that this contribution is due to multiple effects depending on host cell type. Deletion of PilY1 resulted in a lower replication rate in THP-1 macrophages but not in A549 cells. Further on, adhesion to THP-1 macrophages and A549 epithelial cells was decreased. Additionally, the invasion into non-phagocytic A549 epithelial cells was drastically reduced when PilY1 was absent. Complementation variants of a PilY1-negative mutant revealed that the C-terminal PilY domain is essential for restoring the wild type phenotype in adhesion, while the putatively mechanosensitive vWFa domain facilitates invasion into non-phagocytic cells. Since PilY1 also promotes twitching motility of L. pneumophila, we discuss the putative contribution of this newly described virulence factor for bacterial dissemination within infected lung tissue.
    • Properties of dimeric, disulfide-linked rhBMP-2 recovered from E. coli derived inclusion bodies by mild extraction or chaotropic solubilization and subsequent refolding

      Quaas, Bastian; Burmeister, Laura; Li, Zhaopeng; NIMTZ, MANFRED; Hoffmann, Andrea; Rinas, Ursula; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
    • Purification of the human fibroblast growth factor 2 using novel animal-component free materials

      Bolten, Svenja Nicolin; Knoll, Anne-Sophie; Li, Zhaopeng; Gellermann, Pia; Pepelanova, Iliyana; Rinas, Ursula; Scheper, Thomas; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Elsevier BV, 2020-08)
      This paper analyzes the use of animal-component free chromatographic materials for the efficient purifi- cation of the human fibroblast growth factor 2 (hFGF-2). hFGF-2 is produced in Escherichia coli and pu- rified via three different chromatography steps, which include a strong cation exchange chromatography as a capture step, followed by heparin affinity chromatography and an anion exchange chromatography as a polishing step. The affinity chromatography step is based on the animal-derived material heparin. Chemically produced ligands provide a viable alternative to animal-derived components in production processes, since they are characterized by a defined structure which leads to reproducible results and a broad range of applications. The alternative ligands can be assigned to adsorber of the mixed-mode chromatography (MMC) and pseudo-affinity chromatography. Eight different animal-component free materials used as adsorbers in MMC or pseudo-affinity chromatog- raphy were tested as a substitute for heparin. The MMCs were cation exchangers characterized with fur- ther functional residues. The ligands of the pseudo-affinity chromatography were heparin-like ligands which are based on heparin’s molecular structure. The alternative methods were tested as a capture step and in combination with another chromatographic step in the purification procedure of hFGF-2. In each downstream step purity, recovery and yield were analysed and compared to the conventional downstream process. Two types of MMC –the column Foresight TM Nuvia TM cPrime TM from Bio-Rad Laboratories and the col- umn HiTrap TM Capto TM MMC from GE Healthcare Life Sciences - can be regarded as effective animal- component free alternatives to the heparin - based adsorber.
    • Quantitation of large, middle and small hepatitis B surface proteins in HBeAg-positive patients treated with peginterferon alfa-2a.

      Rinker, Franziska; Bremer, Corinna M; Schröder, Kathrin; Wiegand, Steffen B; Bremer, Birgit; Manns, Michael P; Kraft, Anke R; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Yang, Lei; Pavlovic, Vedran; et al. (Wiley, 2019-11-13)
      BACKGROUND & AIMS: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) contains three viral surface proteins, large, middle and small hepatitis B surface protein (LHBs, MHBs, SHBs). Proportions of LHBs and MHBs are lower in patients with inactive versus active chronic infection. Interferon alfa may convert HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) to an inactive carrier state, but prediction of sustained response is unsatisfactory. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that quantification of MHBs and LHBs may allow for a better prognosis of therapeutic response than total hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) concentration. METHODS: HBs proteins were measured before and during peginterferon alfa-2a therapy in serum from 127 Asian patients with HBeAg-positive CHB. Sustained response was defined as hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) seroconversion 24 weeks post-treatment. RESULTS: Mean total HBs levels were significantly lower in responders versus nonresponders at all time points (P<.05) and decreased steadily during the initial 24 weeks' treatment (by 1.16 versus 0.86 ng/mL in responders/nonresponders, respectively) with unchanged relative proportions. Genotype B had a twofold higher proportion of LHBs than genotype C (13% versus 6%). HBV DNA, HBeAg, HBsAg, and HBs protein levels predicted response equally well but not optimally (area under the ROC curve values >0.70). CONCLUSIONS: HBs proteins levels differ by HBV genotype. However, quantification of HBs proteins has no advantage over the already established HBsAg assays to predict response to peginterferon alfa-2a therapy in HBeAg-positive patients.
    • Recombinant protein production-associated metabolic burden reflects anabolic constraints and reveals similarities to a carbon overfeeding response.

      Li, Zhaopeng; Rinas, Ursula; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Wiley, 2020-09-03)
      A comparison of the metabolic response of Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) towards the production of human basic fibroblast growth factor (hFGF-2) or towards carbon overfeeding revealed similarities which point to constraints in anabolic pathways. Contrary to expectations, neither energy generation (e.g., ATP) nor provision of precursor molecules for nucleotides (e.g., uracil) and amino acids (e.g., pyruvate, glutamate) limit host cell and plasmid-encoded functions. Growth inhibition is assumed to occur when hampered anabolic capacities do not match with the ongoing and overwhelming carbon catabolism. Excessive carbon uptake leads to by-product secretion, for example, pyruvate, acetate, glutamate, and energy spillage, for example, accumulation and degradation of adenine nucleotides with concomitant accumulation of extracellular hypoxanthine. The cellular response towards compromised anabolic capacities involves downregulation of cAMP formation, presumably responsible for subsequently better-controlled glucose uptake and resultant accumulation of glucose in the culture medium. Growth inhibition is neglectable under conditions of reduced carbon availability when hampered anabolic capacities also match with catabolic carbon processing. The growth inhibitory effect with accompanying energy spillage, respectively, hypoxanthine secretion and cessation of cAMP formation is not unique to the production of hFGF-2 but observed during the production of other proteins and also during overexpression of genes without transcript translation.
    • RNase Y-mediated regulation of the streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B.

      Broglia, Laura; Materne, Solange; Lécrivain, Anne-Laure; Hahnke, Karin; Le Rhun, Anaïs; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-01-01)
      Endoribonuclease Y (RNase Y) is a crucial regulator of virulence in Gram-positive bacteria. In the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, RNase Y is required for the expression of the major secreted virulence factor streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB), but the mechanism involved in this regulation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the 5' untranslated region of speB mRNA is processed by several RNases including RNase Y. In particular, we identify two RNase Y cleavage sites located downstream of a guanosine (G) residue. To assess whether this nucleotide is required for RNase Y activity in vivo, we mutated it and demonstrate that the presence of this G residue is essential for the processing of the speB mRNA 5' UTR by RNase Y. Although RNase Y directly targets and processes speB, we show that RNase Y-mediated regulation of speB expression occurs primarily at the transcriptional level and independently of the processing in the speB mRNA 5' UTR. To conclude, we demonstrate for the first time that RNase Y processing of an mRNA target requires the presence of a G. We also provide new insights on the speB 5' UTR and on the role of RNase Y in speB regulation.
    • RovC - a novel type of hexameric transcriptional activator promoting type VI secretion gene expression.

      Knittel, Vanessa; Sadana, Pooja; Seekircher, Stephanie; Stolle, Anne-Sophie; Körner, Britta; Volk, Marcel; Jeffries, Cy M; Svergun, Dmitri I; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Scrima, Andrea; et al. (PLOS, 2020-09-23)
      Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are complex macromolecular injection machines which are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria. They are involved in host-cell interactions and pathogenesis, required to eliminate competing bacteria, or are important for the adaptation to environmental stress conditions. Here we identified regulatory elements controlling the T6SS4 of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and found a novel type of hexameric transcription factor, RovC. RovC directly interacts with the T6SS4 promoter region and activates T6SS4 transcription alone or in cooperation with the LysR-type regulator RovM. A higher complexity of regulation was achieved by the nutrient-responsive global regulator CsrA, which controls rovC expression on the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. In summary, our work unveils a central mechanism in which RovC, a novel key activator, orchestrates the expression of the T6SS weapons together with a global regulator to deploy the system in response to the availability of nutrients in the species' native environment.
    • Soluble immune markers in the different phases of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

      Wiegand, Steffen B.; Beggel, Bastian; Wranke, Anika; Aliabadi, Elmira; Jaroszewicz, Jerzy; Xu, Cheng Jian; Li, Yang; Manns, Michael P.; Lengauer, Thomas; Wedemeyer, Heiner; et al. (Nature publishing group, 2019-10-01)
      Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection may follow four different consecutive phases, which are defined by virology as well as biochemical markers and differ in terms of prognosis and need for antiviral treatment. Currently, host responses reflected by immune markers are not considered in this definition. We aimed to study soluble immune markers and their distribution in different phases of chronic HBV infection. In this cross-sectional retrospective study, we investigated a panel of 14 soluble immune markers (SIM) including CXCL10 in 333 patients with chronic HBV infection. In a small cohort of HBeAg positive patients we analyzed SIM before and after HBeAg seroconversion and compared seroconverters to patients with unknown outcome. Significant differences were documented in the levels of several SIM between the four phases of chronic HBV infection. The most pronounced difference among all investigated SIM was observed for CXCL10 concentrations with highest levels in patients with hepatitis. TGF-β and IL-17 revealed different levels between HBeAg negative patients. HBeAg positive patients with HBeAg seroconversion presented higher amounts of IL-12 before seroconversion compared to HBeAg positive patients with unknown follow up. SIM such as CXCL10 but also IL-12, TGF-β and IL-17 may be useful markers to further characterize the phase of chronic HBV infection.
    • Sonderforschungsbereich SFB 738: Optimierung konventioneller und innovativer Transplantate

      Manns, Michael P; Huber, Petra; Jaeckel, Elmar; Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoofenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2017-08-09)
    • Stability and Biological Activity of E. coli Derived Soluble and Precipitated Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2.

      Quaas, Bastian; Burmeister, Laura; Li, Zhaopeng; Satalov, Alexandra; Behrens, Peter; Hoffmann, Andrea; Rinas, Ursula; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Springer, 2019-11-20)
      PURPOSE: There is a plethora of studies on recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) application and delivery systems, but surprisingly few reports address the biophysical properties of the protein which are of crucial importance to develop effective delivery systems or to solve general problems related to rhBMP-2 production, purification, analysis and application. METHODS:The solubility, stability and bioactivity of rhBMP-2 obtained by renaturation of E. coli derived inclusion bodies was assessed at different pH and in different buffer systems using (dynamic) light scattering and thermal shift assays as well as intrinsic fluorescence measurements and luciferase based bioassays. RESULTS: rhBMP-2 is poorly soluble at physiological pH and higher. The presence of divalent anions further decreases the solubility even under acidic conditions. Thermal stability analyses revealed that rhBMP-2 precipitates are more stable compared to the soluble protein. Moreover, correctly folded rhBMP-2 is also bioactive as precipitated protein and precipitates readily dissolve under appropriate buffer conditions. Once properly formed rhBMP-2 also retains biological activity after temporary exposure to high concentrations of chaotropic denaturants. However, care should be taken to discriminate bioactive rhBMP-2 precipitates from misfolded rhBMP-2 aggregates, e.g. resolvability in MES buffer (pH 5) and a discrete peak in thermoshift experiments are mandatory for correctly folded rhBMP-2. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis revealed that E. coli derived rhBMP-2 precipitates are not only bioactive but are also more stable compared to the soluble dimeric molecules. Knowledge about these unusual properties will be helpful to design improved delivery systems requiring lower amounts of rhBMP-2 in clinical applications.