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dc.contributor.authorSchaake, Julia
dc.contributor.authorKronshage, Malte
dc.contributor.authorUliczka, Frank
dc.contributor.authorRohde, Manfred
dc.contributor.authorKnuuti, Tobias
dc.contributor.authorStrauch, Eckhard
dc.contributor.authorFruth, Angelika
dc.contributor.authorWos-Oxley, Melissa
dc.contributor.authorDersch, Petra
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-12T10:51:59Zen
dc.date.available2014-06-12T10:51:59Zen
dc.date.issued2013-11en
dc.identifier.citationHuman and animal isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica show significant serotype-specific colonization and host-specific immune defense properties. 2013, 81 (11):4013-25 Infect. Immun.en
dc.identifier.issn1098-5522en
dc.identifier.pmid23959720en
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/IAI.00572-13en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/321185en
dc.description.abstractYersinia enterocolitica is a human pathogen that is ubiquitous in livestock, especially pigs. The bacteria are able to colonize the intestinal tract of a variety of mammalian hosts, but the severity of induced gut-associated diseases (yersiniosis) differs significantly between hosts. To gain more information about the individual virulence determinants that contribute to colonization and induction of immune responses in different hosts, we analyzed and compared the interactions of different human- and animal-derived isolates of serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8, and O:9 with murine, porcine, and human intestinal cells and macrophages. The examined strains exhibited significant serotype-specific cell binding and entry characteristics, but adhesion and uptake into different host cells were not host specific and were independent of the source of the isolate. In contrast, survival and replication within macrophages and the induced proinflammatory response differed between murine, porcine, and human macrophages, suggesting a host-specific immune response. In fact, similar levels of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) were secreted by murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with all tested isolates, but the equivalent interleukin-8 (IL-8) response of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages was strongly serotype specific and considerably lower in O:3 than in O:8 strains. In addition, all tested Y. enterocolitica strains caused a considerably higher level of secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by porcine than by murine macrophages. This could contribute to limiting the severity of the infection (in particular of serotype O:3 strains) in pigs, which are the primary reservoir of Y. enterocolitica strains pathogenic to humans.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Infection and immunityen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshBacterial Adhesionen
dc.subject.meshCells, Cultureden
dc.subject.meshCytokinesen
dc.subject.meshEndocytosisen
dc.subject.meshEpithelial Cellsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHost-Pathogen Interactionsen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMacrophagesen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BLen
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Viabilityen
dc.subject.meshSerotypingen
dc.subject.meshSwineen
dc.subject.meshYersinia enterocoliticaen
dc.titleHuman and animal isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica show significant serotype-specific colonization and host-specific immune defense properties.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDept. of molecular infection biology, Helmholtz Centre for infection biology, Inhoffenstr. 7, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalInfection and immunityen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T22:07:26Z
html.description.abstractYersinia enterocolitica is a human pathogen that is ubiquitous in livestock, especially pigs. The bacteria are able to colonize the intestinal tract of a variety of mammalian hosts, but the severity of induced gut-associated diseases (yersiniosis) differs significantly between hosts. To gain more information about the individual virulence determinants that contribute to colonization and induction of immune responses in different hosts, we analyzed and compared the interactions of different human- and animal-derived isolates of serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8, and O:9 with murine, porcine, and human intestinal cells and macrophages. The examined strains exhibited significant serotype-specific cell binding and entry characteristics, but adhesion and uptake into different host cells were not host specific and were independent of the source of the isolate. In contrast, survival and replication within macrophages and the induced proinflammatory response differed between murine, porcine, and human macrophages, suggesting a host-specific immune response. In fact, similar levels of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) were secreted by murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with all tested isolates, but the equivalent interleukin-8 (IL-8) response of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages was strongly serotype specific and considerably lower in O:3 than in O:8 strains. In addition, all tested Y. enterocolitica strains caused a considerably higher level of secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by porcine than by murine macrophages. This could contribute to limiting the severity of the infection (in particular of serotype O:3 strains) in pigs, which are the primary reservoir of Y. enterocolitica strains pathogenic to humans.


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