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dc.contributor.authorCamarinha-Silva, Amélia
dc.contributor.authorJáuregui, Ruy
dc.contributor.authorChaves-Moreno, Diego
dc.contributor.authorOxley, Andrew P A
dc.contributor.authorSchaumburg, Frieder
dc.contributor.authorBecker, Karsten
dc.contributor.authorWos-Oxley, Melissa L
dc.contributor.authorPieper, Dietmar H
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-12T11:07:41Z
dc.date.available2014-11-12T11:07:41Z
dc.date.issued2014-09
dc.identifier.citationComparing the anterior nare bacterial community of two discrete human populations using Illumina amplicon sequencing. 2014, 16 (9):2939-52 Environ. Microbiol.en
dc.identifier.issn1462-2920
dc.identifier.pmid24354520
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/1462-2920.12362
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/334759
dc.description.abstractThe anterior nares are an important reservoir for opportunistic pathogens and commensal microorganisms. A barcoded Illumina paired-end sequencing method targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA V1-2 hypervariable region was developed to compare the bacterial diversity of the anterior nares across distinct human populations (volunteers from Germany vs a Babongo Pygmy tribe, Africa). Of the 251 phylotypes detected, 231 could be classified to the genus level and 109 to the species level, including the unambiguous identification of the ubiquitous Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella catarrhalis. The global bacterial community of both adult populations revealed that they shared 85% of the phylotypes, suggesting that our global bacterial communities have likely been with us for thousands of years. Of the 34 phylotypes unique to the non-westernized population, most were related to members within the suborder Micrococcineae. There was an even more overwelming distinction between children and adults of the same population, suggesting a progression of a childhood community of high-diversity comprising species of Moraxellaceae and Streptococcaceae to an adult community of lower diversity comprising species of Propionibacteriaceae, Clostridiales Incertae Sedis XI, Corynebacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceae. Thus, age was a stronger factor for accounting for differing bacterial assemblages than the origin of the human population sampled.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleComparing the anterior nare bacterial community of two discrete human populations using Illumina amplicon sequencing.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMicrobial Interactions and Processes Research Group, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental microbiologyen
refterms.dateFOA2015-09-15T00:00:00Z
html.description.abstractThe anterior nares are an important reservoir for opportunistic pathogens and commensal microorganisms. A barcoded Illumina paired-end sequencing method targeting the 16S ribosomal RNA V1-2 hypervariable region was developed to compare the bacterial diversity of the anterior nares across distinct human populations (volunteers from Germany vs a Babongo Pygmy tribe, Africa). Of the 251 phylotypes detected, 231 could be classified to the genus level and 109 to the species level, including the unambiguous identification of the ubiquitous Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella catarrhalis. The global bacterial community of both adult populations revealed that they shared 85% of the phylotypes, suggesting that our global bacterial communities have likely been with us for thousands of years. Of the 34 phylotypes unique to the non-westernized population, most were related to members within the suborder Micrococcineae. There was an even more overwelming distinction between children and adults of the same population, suggesting a progression of a childhood community of high-diversity comprising species of Moraxellaceae and Streptococcaceae to an adult community of lower diversity comprising species of Propionibacteriaceae, Clostridiales Incertae Sedis XI, Corynebacteriaceae and Staphylococcaceae. Thus, age was a stronger factor for accounting for differing bacterial assemblages than the origin of the human population sampled.


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