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dc.contributor.authorGanesh, Venkateswaran
dc.contributor.authorBaru, Abdul Mannan
dc.contributor.authorHesse, Christina
dc.contributor.authorFriedrich, Christin
dc.contributor.authorGlage, Silke
dc.contributor.authorGohmert, Melanie
dc.contributor.authorJänke, Christine
dc.contributor.authorSparwasser, Tim
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-04T15:02:20Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-04T15:02:20Zen
dc.date.issued2014-03en
dc.identifier.citationSalmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection-induced CD11b+ Gr1+ cells ameliorate allergic airway inflammation. 2014, 82 (3):1052-63 Infect. Immun.en
dc.identifier.issn1098-5522en
dc.identifier.pmid24343652en
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/IAI.01378-13en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/595605en
dc.description.abstractAllergies are mainly characterized as an unrestrained Th2-biased immune response. Epidemiological data associate protection from allergic diseases with the exposure to certain infectious agents during early stages of life. Modulation of the immune response by pathogens has been considered to be a major factor influencing this protection. Recent evidence indicates that immunoregulatory mechanisms induced upon infection ameliorate allergic disorders. A longitudinal study has demonstrated reduced frequency and incidence of asthma in children who reported a prior infection with Salmonella. Experimental studies involving Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-infected murine models have confirmed protection from induced allergic airway inflammation; however, the underlying cause leading to this amelioration remains incompletely defined. In this study, we aimed to delineate the regulatory function of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in the amelioration of allergic airway inflammation in mice. We observed a significant increase in CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid cell populations in mice after infection with S. Typhimurium. Using in vitro and in vivo studies, we confirmed that these myeloid cells reduce airway inflammation by influencing Th2 cells. Further characterization showed that the CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid cells exhibited their inhibitory effect by altering GATA-3 expression and interleukin-4 (IL-4) production by Th2 cells. These results indicate that the expansion of myeloid cells upon S. Typhimurium infection could potentially play a significant role in curtailing allergic airway inflammation. These findings signify the contribution of myeloid cells in preventing Th2-mediated diseases and suggest their possible application as therapeutics.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD11ben
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiationen
dc.subject.meshForkhead Transcription Factorsen
dc.subject.meshGATA3 Transcription Factoren
dc.subject.meshHypersensitivityen
dc.subject.meshInflammationen
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-4en
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subject.meshLungen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred BALB Cen
dc.subject.meshMyeloid Cellsen
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Chemokineen
dc.subject.meshSalmonella Infectionsen
dc.subject.meshSalmonella typhimuriumen
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes, Regulatoryen
dc.subject.meshTh2 Cellsen
dc.titleSalmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection-induced CD11b+ Gr1+ cells ameliorate allergic airway inflammation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInfection and immunityen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-12T21:51:54Z
html.description.abstractAllergies are mainly characterized as an unrestrained Th2-biased immune response. Epidemiological data associate protection from allergic diseases with the exposure to certain infectious agents during early stages of life. Modulation of the immune response by pathogens has been considered to be a major factor influencing this protection. Recent evidence indicates that immunoregulatory mechanisms induced upon infection ameliorate allergic disorders. A longitudinal study has demonstrated reduced frequency and incidence of asthma in children who reported a prior infection with Salmonella. Experimental studies involving Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-infected murine models have confirmed protection from induced allergic airway inflammation; however, the underlying cause leading to this amelioration remains incompletely defined. In this study, we aimed to delineate the regulatory function of Salmonella Typhimurium infection in the amelioration of allergic airway inflammation in mice. We observed a significant increase in CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid cell populations in mice after infection with S. Typhimurium. Using in vitro and in vivo studies, we confirmed that these myeloid cells reduce airway inflammation by influencing Th2 cells. Further characterization showed that the CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid cells exhibited their inhibitory effect by altering GATA-3 expression and interleukin-4 (IL-4) production by Th2 cells. These results indicate that the expansion of myeloid cells upon S. Typhimurium infection could potentially play a significant role in curtailing allergic airway inflammation. These findings signify the contribution of myeloid cells in preventing Th2-mediated diseases and suggest their possible application as therapeutics.


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