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dc.contributor.authorZühlke, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorDörries, Kirsten
dc.contributor.authorBernhardt, Jörg
dc.contributor.authorMaaß, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorMuntel, Jan
dc.contributor.authorLiebscher, Volkmar
dc.contributor.authorPané-Farré, Jan
dc.contributor.authorRiedel, Katharina
dc.contributor.authorLalk, Michael
dc.contributor.authorVölker, Uwe
dc.contributor.authorEngelmann, Susanne
dc.contributor.authorBecher, Dörte
dc.contributor.authorFuchs, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorHecker, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-20T14:43:18Z
dc.date.available2016-07-20T14:43:18Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationCosts of life - Dynamics of the protein inventory of Staphylococcus aureus during anaerobiosis. 2016, 6:28172 Sci Repen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.pmid27344979
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep28172
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/617266
dc.description.abstractAbsolute protein quantification was applied to follow the dynamics of the cytoplasmic proteome of Staphylococcus aureus in response to long-term oxygen starvation. For 1,168 proteins, the majority of all expressed proteins, molecule numbers per cell have been determined to monitor the cellular investments in single branches of bacterial life for the first time. In the presence of glucose the anaerobic protein pattern is characterized by increased amounts of glycolytic and fermentative enzymes such as Eno, GapA1, Ldh1, and PflB. Interestingly, the ferritin-like protein FtnA belongs to the most abundant proteins during anaerobic growth. Depletion of glucose finally leads to an accumulation of different enzymes such as ArcB1, ArcB2, and ArcC2 involved in arginine deiminase pathway. Concentrations of 29 exo- and 78 endometabolites were comparatively assessed and have been integrated to the metabolic networks. Here we provide an almost complete picture on the response to oxygen starvation, from signal transduction pathways to gene expression pattern, from metabolic reorganization after oxygen depletion to beginning cell death and lysis after glucose exhaustion. This experimental approach can be considered as a proof of principle how to combine cell physiology with quantitative proteomics for a new dimension in understanding simple life processes as an entity.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleCosts of life - Dynamics of the protein inventory of Staphylococcus aureus during anaerobiosis.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Microbiology, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, F.-L.-Jahn-Strasse 15, D-17487 Greifswald, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalScientific reportsen
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T00:04:21Z
html.description.abstractAbsolute protein quantification was applied to follow the dynamics of the cytoplasmic proteome of Staphylococcus aureus in response to long-term oxygen starvation. For 1,168 proteins, the majority of all expressed proteins, molecule numbers per cell have been determined to monitor the cellular investments in single branches of bacterial life for the first time. In the presence of glucose the anaerobic protein pattern is characterized by increased amounts of glycolytic and fermentative enzymes such as Eno, GapA1, Ldh1, and PflB. Interestingly, the ferritin-like protein FtnA belongs to the most abundant proteins during anaerobic growth. Depletion of glucose finally leads to an accumulation of different enzymes such as ArcB1, ArcB2, and ArcC2 involved in arginine deiminase pathway. Concentrations of 29 exo- and 78 endometabolites were comparatively assessed and have been integrated to the metabolic networks. Here we provide an almost complete picture on the response to oxygen starvation, from signal transduction pathways to gene expression pattern, from metabolic reorganization after oxygen depletion to beginning cell death and lysis after glucose exhaustion. This experimental approach can be considered as a proof of principle how to combine cell physiology with quantitative proteomics for a new dimension in understanding simple life processes as an entity.


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