• Firefly Bioluminescence-Based Detection of ATP

      Jarrad, Angie M,; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (CSIRO Publishing, 2019-06-04)
      Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence is a powerful light-producing phenomenon that occurs in nature in a variety of organisms, with ATP bioluminescence of fireflies one of the most well-known examples. The firefly ATP bioluminescence reaction has been adapted to the laboratory with a wide range of applications that include monitoring cellular processes, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the detection of bacterial contamination of environmental surfaces. ATP bioluminescence occurs through a multistep reaction between firefly luciferase, ATP, magnesium salt, and oxygen (Scheme 1).[1] As a simplified overview, luciferyl adenylate 2 is first formed from luciferin 1 and Mg2+-ATP. The luciferyl adenylate 2 is then oxidised with molecular oxygen to form a dioxetanone cyclic peroxide intermediate 3. Following intramolecular conversion to produce electronically excited states of oxyluciferin, the dioxetanone is decarboxylated. Finally, the return of excited oxyluciferin to the ground state 5 results in emission of visible light. For more detailed insights into the reaction mechanism, including alternative reactions and different tautomers of oxyluciferin at varying pH values, readers are referred to additional literature.