• A multi-target caffeine derived rhodium(i) N-heterocyclic carbene complex: evaluation of the mechanism of action.

      Zhang, Jing-Jing; Muenzner, Julienne K; Abu El Maaty, Mohamed A; Karge, Bianka; Schobert, Rainer; Wölfl, Stefan; Ott, Ingo; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2016-08-16)
      A rhodium(i) and a ruthenium(ii) complex with a caffeine derived N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand were biologically investigated as organometallic conjugates consisting of a metal center and a naturally occurring moiety. While the ruthenium(ii) complex was largely inactive, the rhodium(i) NHC complex displayed selective cytotoxicity and significant anti-metastatic and in vivo anti-vascular activities and acted as both a mammalian and an E. coli thioredoxin reductase inhibitor. In HCT-116 cells it increased the reactive oxygen species level, leading to DNA damage, and it induced cell cycle arrest, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and triggered apoptosis. This rhodium(i) NHC derivative thus represents a multi-target compound with promising anti-cancer potential.
    • Sulfur, selenium and tellurium pseudopeptides: synthesis and biological evaluation.

      Shaaban, Saad; Sasse, Florenz; Burkholz, Torsten; Jacob, Claus; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2014-07-15)
      A new series of sulfur, selenium and tellurium peptidomimetic compounds was prepared employing the Passerini and Ugi isocyanide based multicomponent reactions (IMCRs). These reactions were clearly superior to conventional methods traditionally used for organoselenium and organotellurium synthesis, such as classical nucleophilic substitution and coupling methods. From the biological point of view, these compounds are of considerable interest because of suspected anticancer and antimicrobial activities. While the sulfur and selenium containing compounds generally did not show either anticancer or antimicrobial activities, their tellurium based counterparts frequently exhibited antimicrobial activity and were also cytotoxic. Some of the compounds synthesized even showed selective activity against certain cancer cells in cell culture. These compounds induced a cell cycle delay in the G0/G1 phase. At closer inspection, the ER and the actin cytoskeleton appeared to be the primary cellular targets of these tellurium compounds, in line with some of our previous studies. As most of these peptidomimetic compounds also comply with Lipinski's Rule of Five, they promise good bioavailability, which needs to be studied as part of future investigations.