• Immunization of pigs to prevent disease in humans: construction and protective efficacy of a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium live negative-marker vaccine.

      Selke, Martin; Meens, Jochen; Springer, Sven; Frank, Ronald; Gerlach, Gerald-F; nstitute for Microbiology, Department of Infectious Diseases, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Hannover, Germany. (2007-05)
      Zoonotic infections caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pose a constant threat to consumer health, with the pig being a particularly major source of multidrug-resistant isolates. Vaccination, as a promising approach to reduce colonization and shedding, has been scarcely used, as it interferes with current control programs relying on serology as a means of herd classification. In order to overcome this problem, we set out to develop a negative-marker vaccine allowing the differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA). Applying an immunoproteomic approach with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, Western blot, and quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry, we identified the OmpD protein as a suitable negative marker. Using allelic exchange, we generated an isogenic mutant of the licensed live vaccine strain Salmoporc and showed that virulence of Salmoporc and that of the mutant strain, SalmoporcDeltaompD, were indistinguishable in BALB/c mice. In a pig infection experiment including two oral immunizations with SalmoporcDeltaompD and challenge with a multiresistant S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 clinical isolate, we confirmed the protective efficacy of SalmoporcDeltaompD in pigs, showing a significant reduction of both clinical symptoms and colonization of lymph nodes and intestinal tract. OmpD immunogenic epitopes were determined by peptide spot array analyses. Upon testing of several 9-mer peptides, each including an immunogenic epitope, one peptide (positions F(100) to Y(108)) that facilitated the detection of infected animals independent of their vaccination status (DIVA function) was identified. The approach described overcomes the problems currently limiting the use of bacterial live vaccines and holds considerable potential for future developments in the field.
    • Multiple antibody targets on herpes B glycoproteins B and D identified by screening sera of infected rhesus macaques with peptide microarrays.

      Hotop, Sven-Kevin; Abd El Wahed, Ahmed; Beutling, Ulrike; Jentsch, Dieter; Motzkus, Dirk; Frank, Ronald; Hunsmann, Gerhard; Stahl-Hennig, Christiane; Fritz, Hans-Joachim; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2014)
      Herpes B virus (or Herpesvirus simiae or Macacine herpesvirus 1) is endemic in many populations of macaques, both in the wild and in captivity. The virus elicits only mild clinical symptoms (if any) in monkeys, but can be transmitted by various routes, most commonly via bites, to humans where it causes viral encephalitis with a high mortality rate. Hence, herpes B constitutes a considerable occupational hazard for animal caretakers, veterinarians and laboratory personnel. Efforts are therefore being made to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection and to improve prognosis after accidental exposure. Among the measures envisaged are serological surveillance of monkey colonies and specific diagnosis of herpes B zoonosis against a background of antibodies recognizing the closely related human herpes simplex virus (HSV). 422 pentadecapeptides covering, in an overlapping fashion, the entire amino acid sequences of herpes B proteins gB and gD were synthesized and immobilized on glass slides. Antibodies present in monkey sera that bind to subsets of the peptide collection were detected by microserological techniques. With 42 different rhesus macaque sera, 114 individual responses to 18 different antibody target regions (ATRs) were recorded, 17 of which had not been described earlier. This finding may pave the way for a peptide-based, herpes B specific serological diagnostic test.