• Specific serum IgG at diagnosis of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream invasion is correlated with disease progression.

      Stentzel, Sebastian; Sundaramoorthy, Nandakumar; Michalik, Stephan; Nordengrün, Maria; Schulz, Sarah; Kolata, Julia; Kloppot, Peggy; Engelmann, Susanne; Steil, Leif; Hecker, Michael; et al. (2015-07-05)
      Although Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent cause of infections, no vaccine is currently available. Active vaccination relies on immune memory, a core competence of the adaptive immune system. To elucidate whether adaptive immunity can provide protection from serious complications of S. aureus infection, a prospective observational study of 44 patients with S. aureus infection complicated by bacteremia was conducted. At diagnosis, serum IgG binding to S. aureus extracellular proteins was quantified on immunoblots and with Luminex-based FLEXMAP 3D™ assays comprising 64 recombinant S. aureus proteins. Results were correlated with the course of the infection with sepsis as the main outcome variable. S. aureus-specific serum IgG levels at diagnosis of S. aureus infection were lower in patients developing sepsis than in patients without sepsis (P<0.05). The pattern of IgG binding to eight selected S. aureus proteins correctly predicted the disease course in 75% of patients. Robust immune memory of S. aureus was associated with protection from serious complications of bacterial invasion. Serum IgG binding to eight conserved S. aureus proteins enabled stratification of patients with high and low risk of sepsis early in the course of S. aureus infections complicated by bacteremia.
    • Staphylococcal serine protease-like proteins are pacemakers of allergic airway reactions to Staphylococcus aureus.

      Stentzel, Sebastian; Teufelberger, Andrea; Nordengrün, Maria; Kolata, Julia; Schmidt, Frank; van Crombruggen, Koen; Michalik, Stephan; Kumpfmüller, Jana; Tischer, Sebastian; Schweder, Thomas; et al. (2017-02)
      A substantial subgroup of asthmatic patients have "nonallergic" or idiopathic asthma, which often takes a severe course and is difficult to treat. The cause might be allergic reactions to the gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, a frequent colonizer of the upper airways. However, the driving allergens of S aureus have remained elusive.