• Development and evaluation of a milk protein transcript depletion method for differential transcriptome analysis in mammary gland tissue.

      Brodhagen, Johanna; Weikard, Rosemarie; Thom, Ulrike; Heimes, Annika; Günther, Juliane; Hadlich, Frieder; Zerbe, Holm; Petzl, Wolfgang; Meyerholz, Marie M; Hoedemaker, Martina; et al. (BioMed Central (BMC), 2019-05-22)
      Background: In the mammary gland transcriptome of lactating dairy cows genes encoding milk proteins are highly abundant, which can impair the detection of lowly expressed transcripts and can bias the outcome in global transcriptome analyses. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a method to deplete extremely highly expressed transcripts in mRNA from lactating mammary gland tissue. Results: Selective RNA depletion was performed by hybridization of antisense oligonucleotides targeting genes encoding the caseins (CSN1S1, CSN1S2, CSN2 and CSN3) and whey proteins (LALBA and PAEP) within total RNA followed by RNase H-mediated elimination of the respective transcripts. The effect of the RNA depletion procedure was monitored by RNA sequencing analysis comparing depleted and non-depleted RNA samples from Escherichia coli (E. coli) challenged and non-challenged udder tissue of lactating cows in a proof of principle experiment. Using RNase H-mediated RNA depletion, the ratio of highly abundant milk protein gene transcripts was reduced in all depleted samples by an average of more than 50% compared to the non-depleted samples. Furthermore, the sensitivity for discovering transcripts with marginal expression levels and transcripts not yet annotated was improved. Finally, the sensitivity to detect significantly differentially expressed transcripts between non-challenged and challenged udder tissue was increased without leading to an inadvertent bias in the pathogen challengeassociated biological signaling pathway patterns. Conclusions: The implementation of selective RNase H-mediated RNA depletion of milk protein gene transcripts from the mammary gland transcriptome of lactating cows will be highly beneficial to establish comprehensive transcript catalogues of the tissue that better reflects its transcriptome complexity.
    • In vivo model to study the impact of genetic variation on clinical outcome of mastitis in uniparous dairy cows.

      Rohmeier, L; Petzl, W; Koy, M; Eickhoff, T; Hülsebusch, A; Jander, S; Macias, L; Heimes, A; Engelmann, S; Hoedemaker, M; et al. (BioMed Central (BMC), 2020-01-31)
      BACKGROUND: In dairy herds, mastitis causes detrimental economic losses. Genetic selection offers a sustainable tool to select animals with reduced susceptibility towards postpartum diseases. Studying underlying mechanisms is important to assess the physiological processes that cause differences between selected haplotypes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to establish an in vivo infection model to study the impact of selecting for alternative paternal haplotypes in a particular genomic region on cattle chromosome 18 for mastitis susceptibility under defined conditions in uniparous dairy cows. RESULTS: At the start of pathogen challenge, no significant differences between the favorable (Q) and unfavorable (q) haplotypes were detected. Intramammary infection (IMI) with Staphylococcus aureus 1027 (S. aureus, n = 24, 96 h) or Escherichia coli 1303 (E. coli, n = 12, 24 h) was successfully induced in all uniparous cows. This finding was confirmed by clinical signs of mastitis and repeated recovery of the respective pathogen from milk samples of challenged quarters in each animal. After S. aureus challenge, Q-uniparous cows showed lower somatic cell counts 24 h and 36 h after challenge (P < 0.05), lower bacterial shedding in milk 12 h after challenge (P < 0.01) and a minor decrease in total milk yield 12 h and 24 h after challenge (P < 0.01) compared to q-uniparous cows. CONCLUSION: An in vivo infection model to study the impact of genetic selection for mastitis susceptibility under defined conditions in uniparous dairy cows was successfully established and revealed significant differences between the two genetically selected haplotype groups. This result might explain their differences in susceptibility towards IMI. These clinical findings form the basis for further in-depth molecular analysis to clarify the underlying genetic mechanisms for mastitis resistance.