• Taxator-tk: precise taxonomic assignment of metagenomes by fast approximation of evolutionary neighborhoods.

      Dröge, J; Gregor, I; McHardy, A C; Department for Algorithmic Bioinformatics, Heinrich Heine University, Universitätsstraße 1, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany, Max-Planck Research Group for Computational Genomics and Epidemiology, Max-Planck Institute for Informatics, University Campus E1 4, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany and Computational Biology of Infection Research, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstraße 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany Department for Algorithmic Bioinformatics, Heinrich Heine University, Universitätsstraße 1, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany, Max-Planck Research Group for Computational Genomics and Epidemiology, Max-Planck Institute for Informatics, University Campus E1 4, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany and Computational Biology of Infection Research, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstraße 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2014-11-10)
      Metagenomics characterizes microbial communities by random shotgun sequencing of DNA isolated directly from an environment of interest. An essential step in computational metagenome analysis is taxonomic sequence assignment, which allows identifying the sequenced community members and reconstructing taxonomic bins with sequence data for the individual taxa. For the massive datasets generated by next-generation sequencing technologies, this cannot be performed with de-novo phylogenetic inference methods. We describe an algorithm and the accompanying software, taxator-tk, which performs taxonomic sequence assignment by fast approximate determination of evolutionary neighbors from sequence similarities.
    • Temporally feathered intensity-modulated radiation therapy: A planning technique to reduce normal tissue toxicity.

      López Alfonso, Juan Carlos; Parsai, Shireen; Joshi, Nikhil; Godley, Andrew; Shah, Chirag; Koyfman, Shlomo A; Caudell, Jimmy J; Fuller, Clifton D; Enderling, Heiko; Scott, Jacob G; et al. (Wiley, 2018-06-08)
      Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has allowed optimization of three-dimensional spatial radiation dose distributions permitting target coverage while reducing normal tissue toxicity. However, radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity is a major contributor to patients' quality of life and often a dose-limiting factor in the definitive treatment of cancer with radiation therapy. We propose the next logical step in the evolution of IMRT using canonical radiobiological principles, optimizing the temporal dimension through which radiation therapy is delivered to further reduce radiation-induced toxicity by increased time for normal tissue recovery. We term this novel treatment planning strategy "temporally feathered radiation therapy" (TFRT). Methods: Temporally feathered radiotherapy plans were generated as a composite of five simulated treatment plans each with altered constraints on particular hypothetical organs at risk (OARs) to be delivered sequentially. For each of these TFRT plans, OARs chosen for feathering receive higher doses while the remaining OARs receive lower doses than the standard fractional dose delivered in a conventional fractionated IMRT plan. Each TFRT plan is delivered a specific weekday, which in effect leads to a higher dose once weekly followed by four lower fractional doses to each temporally feathered OAR. We compared normal tissue toxicity between TFRT and conventional fractionated IMRT plans by using a dynamical mathematical model to describe radiation-induced tissue damage and repair over time. Results: Model-based simulations of TFRT demonstrated potential for reduced normal tissue toxicity compared to conventionally planned IMRT. The sequencing of high and low fractional doses delivered to OARs by TFRT plans suggested increased normal tissue recovery, and hence less overall radiation-induced toxicity, despite higher total doses delivered to OARs compared to conventional fractionated IMRT plans. The magnitude of toxicity reduction by TFRT planning was found to depend on the corresponding standard fractional dose of IMRT and organ-specific recovery rate of sublethal radiation-induced damage. Conclusions: TFRT is a novel technique for treatment planning and optimization of therapeutic radiotherapy that considers the nonlinear aspects of normal tissue repair to optimize toxicity profiles. Model-based simulations of TFRT to carefully conceptualized clinical cases have demonstrated potential for radiation-induced toxicity reduction in a previously described dynamical model of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP).
    • Toward unrestricted use of public genomic data.

      Amann, Rudolf I; Baichoo, Shakuntala; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Bork, Peer; Borodovsky, Mark; Brooksbank, Cath; Chain, Patrick S G; Colwell, Rita R; Daffonchio, Daniele G; Danchin, Antoine; et al. (AAAS, 2019-01-25)
      Despite some notable progress in data sharing policies and practices, restrictions are still often placed on the open and unconditional use of various genomic data after they have received official approval for release to the public domain or to public databases. These restrictions, which often conflict with the terms and conditions of the funding bodies who supported the release of those data for the benefit of the scientific community and society, are perpetuated by the lack of clear guiding rules for data usage. Existing guidelines for data released to the public domain recognize but fail to resolve tensions between the importance of free and unconditional use of these data and the “right” of the data producers to the first publication. This self-contradiction has resulted in a loophole that allows different interpretations and a continuous debate between data producers and data users on the use of public data. We argue that the publicly available data should be treated as open data, a shared resource with unrestricted use for analysis, interpretation, and publication.
    • Transcriptome-wide analysis uncovers the targets of the RNA-binding protein MSI2 and effects of MSI2's RNA-binding activity on IL-6 signaling.

      Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Kloetgen, Andreas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Münch, Philipp C; Hezaveh, Kebria; Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Hoyer, Wolfgang; McHardy, Alice C; Lang, Philipp A; Borkhardt, Arndt; et al. (American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2018-08-20)
      The RNA-binding protein Musashi 2 (MSI2) has emerged as an important regulator in cancer initiation, progression, and drug resistance. Translocations and deregulation of the MSI2 gene are diagnostic of certain cancers, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with translocation t(7;17), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with translocation t(10;17), and some cases of B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pB-ALL). To better understand the function of MSI2 in leukemia, the mRNA targets that are bound and regulated by MSI2 and their MSI2-binding motifs need to be identified. To this end, using photoactivatable ribonucleoside cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) and the multiple EM for motif elicitation (MEME) analysis tool, here we identified MSI2's mRNA targets and the consensus RNA-recognition element (RRE) motif recognized by MSI2 (UUAG). Of note, MSI2 knockdown altered the expression of several genes with roles in eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling pathways. We also show that MSI2 regulates classic interleukin-6 (IL-6) signaling by promoting the degradation of the mRNA of IL-6 signal transducer (IL6ST or GP130), which, in turn, affected the phosphorylation statuses of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK. In summary, we have identified multiple MSI2-regulated mRNAs and provided evidence that MSI2 controls IL6ST activity that control oncogenic signaling networks. Our findings may help inform strategies for unraveling the role of MSI2 in leukemia to pave the way for the development of targeted therapies.
    • Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Survival of CD169 Cells Promotes Immune Activation during Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection.

      Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Kloetgen, Andreas; Namineni, Sukumar; Zhuang, Yuan; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Bellora, Nicolas; Doerrenberg, Mareike; et al. (2018-02-01)
      Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169
    • YBX1 Indirectly Targets Heterochromatin-Repressed Inflammatory Response-Related Apoptosis Genes through Regulating CBX5 mRNA.

      Kloetgen, Andreas; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Schuschel, Konstantin; Hezaveh, Kebria; Picard, Daniel; Schaal, Heiner; Remke, Marc; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Borkhardt, Arndt; McHardy, Alice C; et al. (MDPI, 2020-06-23)
      Medulloblastomas arise from undifferentiated precursor cells in the cerebellum and account for about 20% of all solid brain tumors during childhood; standard therapies include radiation and chemotherapy, which oftentimes come with severe impairment of the cognitive development of the young patients. Here, we show that the posttranscriptional regulator Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1), a DNA- and RNA-binding protein, acts as an oncogene in medulloblastomas by regulating cellular survival and apoptosis. We observed different cellular responses upon YBX1 knockdown in several medulloblastoma cell lines, with significantly altered transcription and subsequent apoptosis rates. Mechanistically, PAR-CLIP for YBX1 and integration with RNA-Seq data uncovered direct posttranscriptional control of the heterochromatin-associated gene CBX5; upon YBX1 knockdown and subsequent CBX5 mRNA instability, heterochromatin-regulated genes involved in inflammatory response, apoptosis and death receptor signaling were de-repressed. Thus, YBX1 acts as an oncogene in medulloblastoma through indirect transcriptional regulation of inflammatory genes regulating apoptosis and represents a promising novel therapeutic target in this tumor entity.