• The bacterial cell envelope as delimiter of anti-infective bioavailability - An in vitro permeation model of the Gram-negative bacterial inner membrane.

      Graef, Florian; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Michel, Jean-Philippe; Wirth, Marius; Ries, Oliver; De Rossi, Chiara; Windbergs, Maike; Rosilio, Véronique; Ducho, Christian; Gordon, Sarah; et al. (2016)
      Gram-negative bacteria possess a unique and complex cell envelope, composed of an inner and outer membrane separated by an intermediate cell wall-containing periplasm. This tripartite structure acts intrinsically as a significant biological barrier, often limiting the permeation of anti-infectives, and so preventing such drugs from reaching their target. Furthermore, identification of the specific permeation-limiting envelope component proves difficult in the case of many anti-infectives, due to the challenges associated with isolation of individual cell envelope structures in bacterial culture. The development of an in vitro permeation model of the Gram-negative inner membrane, prepared by repeated coating of physiologically-relevant phospholipids on Transwell®filter inserts, is therefore reported, as a first step in the development of an overall cell envelope model. Characterization and permeability investigations of model compounds as well as anti-infectives confirmed the suitability of the model for quantitative and kinetically-resolved permeability assessment, and additionally confirmed the importance of employing bacteria-specific base materials for more accurate mimicking of the inner membrane lipid composition - both advantages compared to the majority of existing in vitro approaches. Additional incorporation of further elements of the Gram-negative bacterial cell envelope could ultimately facilitate model application as a screening tool in anti-infective drug discovery or formulation development.
    • Circulating Lipoproteins: A Trojan Horse Guiding Squalenoylated Drugs to LDL-Accumulating Cancer Cells.

      Sobot, Dunja; Mura, Simona; Rouquette, Marie; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Cayre, Fanny; Buchy, Eric; Pieters, Grégory; Garcia-Argote, Sébastien; Windbergs, Maike; Desmaële, Didier; et al. (2017-07-05)
      Selective delivery of anticancer drugs to rapidly growing cancercells can be achieved by taking advantage of their high receptor-mediated uptake of low-density lipoproteins (LDLs). Indeed, wehave recently discovered that nanoparticles made of the squa-lene derivative of the anticancer agent gemcitabine (SQGem)strongly interacted with the LDLs in the human blood. In thepresent study, we showed both in vitro and in vivo that suchinteraction led to the preferential accumulation of SQGem incancer cells (MDA-MB-231) with high LDL receptor expression.As a result, an improved pharmacological activity has beenobserved in MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice, an experi-mental model with a low sensitivity to gemcitabine. Accord-ingly, we proved that the use of squalene moieties not onlyinduced the gemcitabine insertion into lipoproteins, but thatit could also be exploited to indirectly target cancer cells in vivo.
    • Redispersible spray-dried lipid-core nanocapsules intended for oral delivery: the influence of the particle number on redispersibility.

      Andrade, Diego Fontana de; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Benvenutti, Edilson Valmir; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Windbergs, Maike; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver; Helmholtz-Institut für pharmazeitische Forschung Saarland, Universitäzscampus E8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2017-11-20)
      This study proposes a new approach to produce easily redispersible spray-dried lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC) intended for oral administration, evaluating the influence of the particle number density of the fed sample. The proposed approach to develop redispersible spray-dried LNC formulations intended for oral route is innovative, evidencing the needing of an optimization of the initial particle number density in the liquid suspension of nanocapsules. A mixture of maltodextrin and L-leucine (90:10 w/w) was used as drying adjuvant. Dynamic light scattering, turbidimetry, determination of surface area and pore size distribution, electron microscopy and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) were used to characterize the proposed system and to better understand the differences in the redispersion behavior. An easily aqueous redispersion of the spray-dried powder composed of maltodextrin and L-leucine (90:10 w/w) was obtained, depending on the particle number density. Their surface area decreased in the presence of LNC. CRM enabled the visualization of the spatial distribution of the different compounds in the powders affording to better understand the influence of the particle number density of the fed sample on their redispersion behavior. This study shows the need for optimizing initial particle number density in the liquid formulation to develop redispersible spray-dried LNC powders.
    • Redispersible Spray-Dried Powder Containing Nanoencapsulated Curcumin: the Drying Process Does Not Affect Neuroprotection In vitro.

      de Andrade, Diego Fontana; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Hoppe, Juliana Bender; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Windbergs, Maike; Külkamp-Guerreiro, Irene; Salbego, Christianne Gazzana; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany.;TWINCORE, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH,Feodor-Lynen Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany. (Springer, 2019-08-12)
      A redispersible spray-dried formulation containing curcumin-loaded, lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC-C) was developed for oral administration. The neuroprotective activity of curcumin after the spray-drying process was evaluated in vitro. The spray-dried powder (SD-LNC-C) was produced using a drying adjuvant composed of a blend of maltodextrin and L-leucine (90:10 w/w). Acceptable process yield (~ 70%) and drug content (6.5 ± 0.2 mg g-1) were obtained. SD-LNC-C was formed by smooth, spherical-shaped particles, and confocal Raman analysis indicated the distribution of the LNC-C on the surface of the leucine/maltodextrin agglomerates. The surface of the agglomerates was formed by a combination of LNC-C and adjuvants, and laser diffraction showed that SD-LNC-C had adequate aqueous redispersion, with no loss of controlled drug release behaviour of LNC-C. The in vitro curcumin activity against the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced proinflammatory response in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures was evaluated. Both formulations (LNC-C and SD-LNC-C) reduced TNF-α to similar levels. Therefore, neuroprotection of curcumin in vitro may be improved by nanoencapsulation followed by spray-drying, with no loss of this superior performance. Hence, the redispersible spray-dried powder proposed here represents a suitable approach for the development of innovative nanomedicines containing curcumin for the prevention/treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.
    • Synthesis of a deuterated probe for the confocal Raman microscopy imaging of squalenoyl nanomedicines

      Buchy, Eric; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Windbergs, Maike; Sobot, Dunja; Dejean, Camille; Mura, Simona; Couvreur, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier; Helmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1,56123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2016-06-06)
    • Three-dimensional hierarchical cultivation of human skin cells on bio-adaptive hybrid fibers.

      Planz, Viktoria; Seif, Salem; Atchison, Jennifer S; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Sparenberg, Lisa; Kroner, Elmar; Windbergs, Maike; Helmholtz-Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS),Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2016-07-11)
      The human skin comprises a complex multi-scale layered structure with hierarchical organization of different cells within the extracellular matrix (ECM). This supportive fiber-reinforced structure provides a dynamically changing microenvironment with specific topographical, mechanical and biochemical cell recognition sites to facilitate cell attachment and proliferation. Current advances in developing artificial matrices for cultivation of human cells concentrate on surface functionalizing of biocompatible materials with different biomolecules like growth factors to enhance cell attachment. However, an often neglected aspect for efficient modulation of cell-matrix interactions is posed by the mechanical characteristics of such artificial matrices. To address this issue, we fabricated biocompatible hybrid fibers simulating the complex biomechanical characteristics of native ECM in human skin. Subsequently, we analyzed interactions of such fibers with human skin cells focusing on the identification of key fiber characteristics for optimized cell-matrix interactions. We successfully identified the mediating effect of bio-adaptive elasto-plastic stiffness paired with hydrophilic surface properties as key factors for cell attachment and proliferation, thus elucidating the synergistic role of these parameters to induce cellular responses. Co-cultivation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes on such fiber mats representing the specific cells in dermis and epidermis resulted in a hierarchical organization of dermal and epidermal tissue layers. In addition, terminal differentiation of keratinocytes at the air interface was observed. These findings provide valuable new insights into cell behaviour in three-dimensional structures and cell-material interactions which can be used for rational development of bio-inspired functional materials for advanced biomedical applications.
    • Vibrational spectroscopic imaging and live cell video microscopy for studying differentiation of primary human alveolar epithelial cells.

      Vukosavljevic, Branko; Hittinger, Marius; Hachmeister, Henning; Pilger, Christian; Murgia, Xabier; Gepp, Michael M; Gentile, Luca; Huwer, Hanno; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Huser, Thomas; et al. (Wiley-VCH, 2019-02-20)