• Modulating the Barrier Function of Human Alveolar Epithelial (hAELVi) Cell Monolayers as a Model of Inflammation.

      Metz, Julia Katharina; Wiegand, Birgit; Schnur, Sabrina; Knoth, Katharina; Schneider-Daum, Nicole; Groß, Henrik; Croston, Glenn; Reinheimer, Torsten Michael; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Hittinger, Marius; et al. (SAGE Publications, 2021-01-29)
      The incidence of inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains an important problem, particularly in the present time with the Covid-19 pandemic. However, an adequate in vitro test system to monitor the barrier function of the alveolar epithelium during inflammation and for assessing anti-inflammatory drugs is urgently needed. Therefore, we treated human Alveolar Epithelial Lentivirus-immortalised cells (hAELVi cells) with the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α (25 ng/ml) and IFN-γ (30 ng/ml), in the presence or absence of hydrocortisone (HC). While TNF-α and IFN-γ are known to reduce epithelial barrier properties, HC could be expected to protect the barrier function and result in an anti-inflammatory effect. We investigated the impact of anti-inflammatory/inflammatory treatment on transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the apparent permeability coefficient (P app ) of the low permeability marker sodium fluorescein (NaFlu). After incubating hAELVi cells for 48 hours with a combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ, there was a significant decrease in TEER and a significant increase in the P app . The presence of HC maintained the TEER values and barrier properties, so that no significant P app change was observed. By using hAELVi cells to study anti-inflammatory drugs in vitro, the need for animal experiments could be reduced and pulmonary drug development accelerated.
    • Towards More Predictive, Physiological and Animal-free in vitro Models: Advances in Cell and Tissue Culture 2020 Conference Proceedings.

      Singh, Bhumika; Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Ali, Zulfiqur; Bailey, Jarrod; Budyn, Elisa; Civita, Prospero; Clift, Martin J D; Connelly, John T; Constant, Samuel; Hittinger, Marius; et al. (Fund for the Replacement of Animals in Medical Experiments (FRAME), 2021-07-06)
      Experimental systems that faithfully replicate human physiology at cellular, tissue and organ level are crucial to the development of efficacious and safe therapies with high success rates and low cost. The development of such systems is challenging and requires skills, expertise and inputs from a diverse range of experts, such as biologists, physicists, engineers, clinicians and regulatory bodies. Kirkstall Limited, a biotechnology company based in York, UK, organised the annual conference, Advances in Cell and Tissue Culture (ACTC), which brought together people having a variety of expertise and interests, to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of cell and tissue culture and in vitro modelling. The conference has also been influential in engaging animal welfare organisations in the promotion of research, collaborative projects and funding opportunities. This report describes the proceedings of the latest ACTC conference, which was held virtually on 30th September and 1st October 2020, and included sessions on in vitro models in the following areas: advanced skin and respiratory models, neurological disease, cancer research, advanced models including 3-D, fluid flow and co-cultures, diabetes and other age-related disorders, and animal-free research. The roundtable session on the second day was very interactive and drew huge interest, with intriguing discussion taking place among all participants on the theme of replacement of animal models of disease.