• Immune recognition of Streptococcus pyogenes by dendritic cells.

      Loof, Torsten G; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva; Infection Immunology Research Group, Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, Inhoffenstrasse 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2008-06)
      Streptococcus pyogenes is one of the most frequent human pathogens. Recent studies have identified dendritic cells (DCs) as important contributors to host defense against S. pyogenes. The objective of this study was to identify the receptors involved in immune recognition of S. pyogenes by DCs. To determine whether Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were involved in DC sensing of S. pyogenes, we evaluated the response of bone marrow-derived DCs obtained from mice deficient in MyD88, an adapter molecule used by almost all TLRs, following S. pyogenes stimulation. Despite the fact that MyD88(-/-) DCs did not differ from wild-type DCs in the ability to internalize and kill S. pyogenes, the up-regulation of maturation markers, such as CD40, CD80, and CD86, and the production of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, were dramatically impaired in S. pyogenes-stimulated MyD88(-/-) DCs. These results suggest that signaling through TLRs is the principal pathway by which DCs sense S. pyogenes and become activated. Surprisingly, DCs deficient in signaling through each of the TLRs reported as potential receptors for gram-positive cell components, such as TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, and TLR2/6, were not impaired in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and the up-regulation of costimulatory molecules after S. pyogenes stimulation. In conclusion, our results exclude a major involvement of a single TLR or the heterodimer TLR2/6 in S. pyogenes sensing by DCs and argue for a multimodal recognition in which a combination of several different TLR-mediated signals is essential for a rapid and effective response to the pathogen.