• BCL6--regulated by AhR/ARNT and wild-type MEF2B--drives expression of germinal center markers MYBL1 and LMO2.

      Ding, Jie; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Geffers, Robert; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Romani, Julia; Scherr, Michaela; Vaas, Lea A I; et al. (2015-06)
      Genetic heterogeneity is widespread in tumors, but poorly documented in cell lines. According to immunoglobulin hypermutation analysis, the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell line U-2932 comprises two subpopulations faithfully representing original tumor subclones. We set out to identify molecular causes underlying subclone-specific expression affecting 221 genes including surface markers and the germinal center oncogenes BCL6 and MYC. Genomic copy number variations explained 58/221 genes differentially expressed in the two U-2932 clones. Subclone-specific expression of the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and the resulting activity of the AhR/ARNT complex underlaid differential regulation of 11 genes including MEF2B. Knock-down and inhibitor experiments confirmed that AhR/ARNT regulates MEF2B, a key transcription factor for BCL6. AhR, MEF2B and BCL6 levels correlated not only in the U-2932 subclones but in the majority of 23 cell lines tested, indicting overexpression of AhR as a novel mechanism behind BCL6 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Enforced modulation of BCL6 affected 48/221 signature genes. Although BCL6 is known as a transcriptional repressor, 28 genes were up-regulated, including LMO2 and MYBL1 which, like BCL6, signify germinal center diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Supporting the notion that BCL6 can induce gene expression, BCL6 and the majority of potential targets were co-regulated in a series of B-cell lines. In conclusion, genomic copy number aberrations, activation of AhR/ARNT, and overexpression of BCL6 are collectively responsible for differential expression of more than 100 genes in subclones of the U-2932 cell line. It is particularly interesting that BCL6 - regulated by AhR/ARNT and wild-type MEF2B - may drive expression of germinal center markers in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    • Genomic Landscape of Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma Cell Lines.

      Dai, Haiping; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Nagel, Stefan; Eberth, Sonja; Pommerenke, Claudia; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Geffers, Robert; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corrina; et al. (2015)
      Primary mediastinal B-Cell lymphoma (PMBL) is a recently defined entity comprising ~2-10% non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Unlike most NHL subtypes, PMBL lacks recurrent gene rearrangements to serve as biomarkers or betray target genes. While druggable, late chemotherapeutic complications warrant the search for new targets and models. Well characterized tumor cell lines provide unlimited material to serve as preclinical resources for verifiable analyses directed at the discovery of new biomarkers and pathological targets using high throughput microarray technologies. The same cells may then be used to seek intelligent therapies directed at clinically validated targets. Four cell lines have emerged as potential PMBL models: FARAGE, KARPAS-1106P, MEDB-1 and U-2940. Transcriptionally, PMBL cell lines cluster near c(lassical)-HL and B-NHL examples showing they are related but separate entities. Here we document genomic alterations therein, by cytogenetics and high density oligonucleotide/SNP microarrays and parse their impact by integrated global expression profiling. PMBL cell lines were distinguished by moderate chromosome rearrangement levels undercutting cHL, while lacking oncogene translocations seen in B-NHL. In total 61 deletions were shared by two or more cell lines, together with 12 amplifications (≥4x) and 72 homozygous regions. Integrated genomic and transcriptional profiling showed deletions to be the most important class of chromosome rearrangement. Lesions were mapped to several loci associated with PMBL, e.g. 2p15 (REL/COMMD1), 9p24 (JAK2, CD274), 16p13 (SOCS1, LITAF, CIITA); plus new or tenuously associated loci: 2p16 (MSH6), 6q23 (TNFAIP3), 9p22 (CDKN2A/B), 20p12 (PTPN1). Discrete homozygous regions sometimes substituted focal deletions accompanied by gene silencing implying a role for epigenetic or mutational inactivation. Genomic amplifications increasing gene expression or gene-activating rearrangements were respectively rare or absent. Our findings highlight biallelic deletions as a major class of chromosomal lesion in PMBL cell lines, while endorsing the latter as preclinical models for hunting and testing new biomarkers and actionable targets.
    • Neoplastic MiR-17~92 deregulation at a DNA fragility motif (SIDD).

      Schneider, Björn; Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corinna; Geffers, Robert; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Department of Human and Animal Cell Cultures, DSMZ-German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures, Inhoffenstr. 7b, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. bjoern.schneider@med.uni-rostock.de (2012-03)
      Chromosomal or mutational activation of BCL6 (at 3q27) typifies diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) which in the germinal center subtype may be accompanied by focal amplification of chromosome band 13q31 effecting upregulation of miR-17~92. Using long distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction, we mapped and sequenced six breakpoints of a complex BCL6 rearrangement t(3;13)(q27;q31)t(12;13)(p11;q31) in DLBCL cells, which places miR-17~92 antisense within the resulting ITPR2-BCL6 chimeric fusion gene rearrangement. MiR-17~92 members were upregulated ~15-fold over controls in a copy number independent manner consistent with structural deregulation. MIR17HG and ITPR2-BCL6 were, despite their close configuration, independently expressed, discounting antisense regulation. MIR17HG in t(3;13)t(12;13) cells proved highly responsive to treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors implicating epigenetic deregulation, consistent with which increased histone-H3 acetylation was detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation near the upstream MIR17HG breakpoint. Remarkably, 5/6 DNA breaks in the t(3;13)t(12;13) precisely cut at stress-induced DNA duplex destabilization (SIDD) peaks reminiscent of chromosomal fragile sites, while the sixth lay 150 bp distant. Extended SIDD profiling showed that additional oncomiRs also map to SIDD peaks. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that 11 of 52 (21%) leukemia-lymphoma (L-L) cell lines with 13q31 involvement bore structural rearrangements at/near MIR17HG associated with upregulation. As well as fueling genome instability, SIDD peaks mark regulatory nuclear-scaffold matrix attachment regions open to nucleosomal acetylation. Collectively, our data indict a specific DNA instability motif (SIDD) in chromosome rearrangement, specifically alterations activating miR-17~92 epigenetically via promoter hyperacetylation, and supply a model for the clustering of oncomiRs near cancer breakpoints.
    • Peripheral T-cell lymphoma cell line T8ML-1 highlights conspicuous targeting of PVRL2 by t(14;19)(q11.2;q13.3).

      Ehrentraut, Stefan; Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corinna; Zaborski, Margarete; Geffers, Robert; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; et al. (2017-01-01)
      Focal amplifications and chromosome translocations involving the long arm of chromosome 19 (19q13.3) are recurrent in T-cell lymphoma, where neighboring BCL3 and PVRL2 are competing target genes. Here we present the oncogenomic characterization of a peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) cell line T8ML-1 to reveal t(14;19)(q11.2;q13.3) juxtaposing TRA@ and PVRL2. Parallel mRNA and protein expression data for the 19q13.3 region of interest pinpointed PVRL2 as the sole conspicuous target therein. Collectively, our findings endorse T8ML-1 as the first proven cell line model for t(14;19)/PTCL.
    • t(8;9)(p22;p24)/PCM1-JAK2 Activates SOCS2 and SOCS3 via STAT5.

      Ehrentraut, Stefan; Nagel, Stefan; Scherr, Michaela E; Schneider, Björn; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Geffers, Robert; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corinna; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Ketterling, Rhett P; et al. (2013)
      Fusions of the tyrosine kinase domain of JAK2 with multiple partners occur in leukemia/lymphoma where they reportedly promote JAK2-oligomerization and autonomous signalling, Affected entities are promising candidates for therapy with JAK2 signalling inhibitors. While JAK2-translocations occur in myeloid, B-cell and T-cell lymphoid neoplasms, our findings suggest their incidence among the last group is low. Here we describe the genomic, transcriptional and signalling characteristics of PCM1-JAK2 formed by t(8;9)(p22;p24) in a trio of cell lines established at indolent (MAC-1) and aggressive (MAC-2A/2B) phases of a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). To investigate signalling, PCM1-JAK2 was subjected to lentiviral knockdown which inhibited 7 top upregulated genes in t(8;9) cells, notably SOCS2/3. SOCS3, but not SOCS2, was also upregulated in a chronic eosinophilic leukemia bearing PCM1-JAK2, highlighting its role as a central signalling target of JAK2 translocation neoplasia. Conversely, expression of GATA3, a key T-cell developmental gene silenced in aggressive lymphoma cells, was partially restored by PCM1-JAK2 knockdown. Treatment with a selective JAK2 inhibitor (TG101348) to which MAC-1/2A/2B cells were conspicuously sensitive confirmed knockdown results and highlighted JAK2 as the active moiety. PCM1-JAK2 signalling required pSTAT5, supporting a general paradigm of STAT5 activation by JAK2 alterations in lymphoid malignancies. MAC-1/2A/2B - the first JAK2-translocation leukemia/lymphoma cell lines described - display conspicuous JAK/STAT signalling accompanied by T-cell developmental and autoimmune disease gene expression signatures, confirming their fitness as CTCL disease models. Our data support further investigation of SOCS2/3 as signalling effectors, prognostic indicators and potential therapeutic targets in cancers with JAK2 rearrangements.
    • Th17 cytokine differentiation and loss of plasticity after SOCS1 inactivation in a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

      Ehrentraut, Stefan; Schneider, Björn; Nagel, Stefan; Pommerenke, Claudia; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Geffers, Robert; Feist, Maren; Kaufmann, Maren; Meyer, Corinna; Kadin, Marshall E; et al. (2016-04-28)
      We propose that deregulated T-helper-cell (Th) signaling underlies evolving Th17 cytokine expression seen during progression of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Accordingly, we developed a lymphoma progression model comprising cell lines established at indolent (MAC-1) and aggressive (MAC-2A) CTCL stages. We discovered activating JAK3 (V722I) mutations present at indolent disease, reinforced in aggressive disease by novel compound heterozygous SOCS1 (G78R/D105N) JAK-binding domain inactivating mutations. Though isogenic, indolent and aggressive-stage cell lines had diverged phenotypically, the latter expressing multiple Th17 related cytokines, the former a narrower profile. Importantly, indolent stage cells remained poised for Th17 cytokine expression, readily inducible by treatment with IL-2 - a cytokine which mitigates Th17 differentiation in mice. In indolent stage cells JAK3 expression was boosted by IL-2 treatment. Th17 conversion of MAC-1 cells by IL-2 was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 or STAT5, implicating IL2RG - JAK3 - STAT5 signaling in plasticity responses. Like IL-2 treatment, SOCS1 knockdown drove indolent stage cells to mimic key aggressive stage properties, notably IL17F upregulation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that SOCS1 mutations abolished JAK3 binding, revealing a key role for SOCS1 in regulating JAK3/STAT5 signaling. Collectively, our results show how JAK/STAT pathway mutations contribute to disease progression in CTCL cells by potentiating inflammatory cytokine signaling, widening the potential therapeutic target range for this intractable entity. MAC-1/2A cells also provide a candidate human Th17 laboratory model for identifying potentally actionable CTCL markers or targets and testing their druggability in vitro.
    • Transcriptional activation of prostate specific homeobox gene NKX3-1 in subsets of T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).

      Nagel, Stefan; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Tomasch, Jürgen; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Schneider, Björn; Geffers, Robert; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F; et al. (2012)
      Homeobox genes encode transcription factors impacting key developmental processes including embryogenesis, organogenesis, and cell differentiation. Reflecting their tight transcriptional control, homeobox genes are often embedded in large non-coding, cis-regulatory regions, containing tissue specific elements. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) homeobox genes are frequently deregulated by chromosomal aberrations, notably translocations adding T-cell specific activatory elements. NKX3-1 is a prostate specific homeobox gene activated in T-ALL patients expressing oncogenic TAL1 or displaying immature T-cell characteristics. After investigating regulation of NKX3-1 in primary cells and cell lines, we report its ectopic expression in T-ALL cells independent of chromosomal rearrangements. Using siRNAs and expression profiling, we exploited NKX3-1 positive T-ALL cell lines as tools to investigate aberrant activatory mechanisms. Our data confirmed NKX3-1 activation by TAL1/GATA3/LMO and identified LYL1 as an alternative activator in immature T-ALL cells devoid of GATA3. Moreover, we showed that NKX3-1 is directly activated by early T-cell homeodomain factor MSX2. These activators were regulated by MLL and/or by IL7-, BMP4- and IGF2-signalling. Finally, we demonstrated homeobox gene SIX6 as a direct leukemic target of NKX3-1 in T-ALL. In conclusion, we identified three major mechanisms of NKX3-1 regulation in T-ALL cell lines which are represented by activators TAL1, LYL1 and MSX2, corresponding to particular T-ALL subtypes described in patients. These results may contribute to the understanding of leukemic transcriptional networks underlying disturbed T-cell differentiation in T-ALL.