• The Core Proteome of Biofilm-Grown Clinical Isolates.

      Erdmann, Jelena; Thöming, Janne G; Pohl, Sarah; Pich, Andreas; Lenz, Christof; Häussler, Susanne; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MPDI, 2019-09-23)
      Comparative genomics has greatly facilitated the identification of shared as well as unique features among individual cells or tissues, and thus offers the potential to find disease markers. While proteomics is recognized for its potential to generate quantitative maps of protein expression, comparative proteomics in bacteria has been largely restricted to the comparison of single cell lines or mutant strains. In this study, we used a data independent acquisition (DIA) technique, which enables global protein quantification of large sample cohorts, to record the proteome profiles of overall 27 whole genome sequenced and transcriptionally profiled clinical isolates of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Analysis of the proteome profiles across the 27 clinical isolates grown under planktonic and biofilm growth conditions led to the identification of a core biofilm-associated protein profile. Furthermore, we found that protein-to-mRNA ratios between different P. aeruginosa strains are well correlated, indicating conserved patterns of post-transcriptional regulation. Uncovering core regulatory pathways, which drive biofilm formation and associated antibiotic tolerance in bacterial pathogens, promise to give clues to interactions between bacterial species and their environment and could provide useful targets for new clinical interventions to combat biofilm-associated infections.
    • Therapeutic modulation of RNA-binding protein Rbm38 facilitates re-endothelialization after arterial injury.

      Sonnenschein, Kristina; Fiedler, Jan; Pfanne, Angelika; Just, Annette; Mitzka, Saskia; Geffers, Robert Robert; Pich, Andreas; Bauersachs, Johann; Thum, Thomas; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Oxford Academic, 2019-03-07)
      Aims Delayed re-endothelialization after balloon angioplasty in patients with coronary or peripheral artery disease impairs vascular healing and leads to neointimal proliferation. In the present study, we examined the effect of RNA-binding motif protein 38 (Rbm38) during re-endothelialization in a murine model of experimental vascular injury. Methods and results Left common carotid arteries of C57BL/6 mice were electrically denudated and endothelial regeneration was evaluated. Profiling of RNA-binding proteins revealed dysregulated expression of Rbm38 in the denudated and regenerated areas. We next tested the importance of Rbm38 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECS) and analysed its effects on cellular proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Rbm38 silencing in vitro demonstrated important beneficial functional effects on migratory capacity and proliferation of endothelial cells. In vivo, local silencing of Rbm38 also improved re-endothelialization of denuded carotid arteries. Luciferase reporter assay identified miR-98 and let-7f to regulate Rbm38 and the positive proliferative properties of Rbm38 silencing in vitro and in vivo were mimicked by therapeutic overexpression of these miRNAs. Conclusion The present data identified Rbm38 as an important factor of the regulation of various endothelial cell functions. Local inhibition of Rbm38 as well as overexpression of the upstream regulators miR-98 and let-7f improved endothelial regeneration in vivo and thus may be a novel therapeutic entry point to avoid endothelial damage after balloon angioplasty.
    • Unravelling post-transcriptional PrmC-dependent regulatory mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

      Krueger, Jonas; Pohl, Sarah; Preusse, Matthias; Kordes, Adrian; Rugen, Nils; Schniederjans, Monika; Pich, Andreas; Häussler, Susanne; Twincore, Zentrum für experimentelle und klinische Infektionsforschung GmbH, Feodor-Lynen Str. 7, 30625 Hannover, Germany. (2016-10)
      Transcriptional regulation has a central role in cellular adaptation processes and is well investigated. In contrast, the importance of the post-transcriptional regulation on these processes is less well defined. The technological advancements have been critical to precisely quantify protein and mRNA level changes and hold promise to provide more insights into how post-transcriptional regulation determines phenotypes. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the methyltransferase PrmC methylates peptide chain release factors to facilitate translation termination. Loss of PrmC activity abolishes anaerobic growth and leads to reduced production of quorum sensing-associated virulence factors. Here, by applying SILAC technology in combination with mRNA-sequencing, they provide evidence that the P. aeruginosa phenotype can be attributed to a change in protein to mRNA ratios of selected protein groups. The UAG-dependent translation termination was more dependent on PrmC activity than the UAA- and UGA-dependent translation termination. Additionally, a bias toward UAG stop codons in global transcriptional regulators was found. The finding that this bias in stop codon usage determines the P. aeruginosa phenotype is unexpected and adds complexity to regulatory circuits. Via modulation of PrmC activity the bacterial cell can cross-regulate targets independently of transcriptional signals, a process with an underestimated impact on the bacterial phenotype.