• Antibodies against C-reactive protein cross-react with 60-kilodalton heat shock proteins.

      Udvarnoki, Katalin; Cervenak, László; Uray, Katalin; Hudecz, Ferenc; Kacskovics, Imre; Spallek, Ralf; Singh, Mahavir; Füst, George; Prohászka, Zoltán; Third Department of Medicine, Semmelweis University, H-1125 Budapest, Kútvölgyi st. 4, Hungary. (2007-04)
      C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant frequently used in histochemistry as a marker of ongoing inflammation. Furthermore, CRP is a powerful biomarker for the prediction of coronary artery disease risk. Heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) and CRP are complement-activating molecules, and the effect of their interactions on the regulation of complement activation was studied. However, during the first experiments, we learned that polyclonal anti-CRP antibodies cross-react with Hsp60. Therefore, the aim of our present study was to analyze the cross-reactivity of anti-CRP antibodies (Ab) with Hsp60 in solid-phase enzyme immune assays, in epitope studies using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides, and in Ouchterlony analyses. We found that three different commercial rabbit polyclonal antibodies and two monoclonal (9C9 and CRP-8) anti-CRP antibodies specifically recognize recombinant human Hsp60 and recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Hsp65, respectively. Hsp60 was found to inhibit the binding of anti-CRP polyclonal Ab to Hsp60. Six epitope regions of Hsp60 were recognized by the anti-CRP antibodies, and one region (amino acids [AA] 218 to 232) was recognized by monoclonal antibodies CRP-8 and 9C9. This epitope region of Hsp60 displays 26.6% amino acid identity to CRP AA region 77 to 90. These data suggest that the B-cell epitopes shared between CRP and Hsp60 give rise to a true mimicry-based cross-reaction and the induction of cross-reactive antibodies. Our study underlines the importance of thorough study design and careful interpretation of results while using polyclonal anti-CRP antibodies for histochemistry, especially at low dilutions. Furthermore, analytical interference with Hsp60 in CRP assays should also be tested.
    • A chemical proteomics approach to identify c-di-GMP binding proteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

      Düvel, Juliane; Bertinetti, Daniela; Möller, Stefan; Schwede, Frank; Morr, Michael; Wissing, Josef; Radamm, Lena; Zimmermann, Bastian; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Jänsch, Lothar; et al. (2012-02)
      In many bacteria, high levels of the ubiquitous second messenger c-di-GMP have been demonstrated to suppress motility and to promote the establishment of surface-adherent biofilm communities. While molecular mechanisms underlying the synthesis and degradation of c-di-GMP have been comprehensively characterized, little is known about how c-di-GMP mediates its regulatory effects. In this study, we have established a chemical proteomics approach to identify c-di-GMP interacting proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A functionalized c-di-GMP analog, 2'-aminohexylcarbamoyl-c-di-GMP (2'-AHC-c-di-GMP), was chemically synthesized and following its immobilization used to perform affinity pull down experiments. Enriched proteins were subsequently identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry. 2'-AHC-c-di-GMP was also employed in surface plasmon resonance studies to evaluate and quantify the interaction of c-di-GMP with its potential target molecules in vitro. The biochemical tools presented here may serve the identification of novel classes of c-di-GMP effectors and thus contribute to a better characterization and understanding of the complex c-di-GMP signaling network.
    • Cross talk between the response regulators PhoB and TctD allows for the integration of diverse environmental signals in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

      Bielecki, Piotr; Jensen, Vanessa; Schulze, Wiebke; Gödeke, Julia; Strehmel, Janine; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Nicolai, Tanja; Bielecka, Agata; Wille, Thorsten; Gerlach, Roman G; et al. (2015-07-27)
      Two-component systems (TCS) serve as stimulus-response coupling mechanisms to allow organisms to adapt to a variety of environmental conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes for more than 100 TCS components. To avoid unwanted cross-talk, signaling cascades are very specific, with one sensor talking to its cognate response regulator (RR). However, cross-regulation may provide means to integrate different environmental stimuli into a harmonized output response. By applying a split luciferase complementation assay, we identified a functional interaction of two RRs of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily, namely PhoB and TctD in P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional profiling, ChIP-seq analysis and a global motif scan uncovered the regulons of the two RRs as well as a quadripartite binding motif in six promoter regions. Phosphate limitation resulted in PhoB-dependent expression of the downstream genes, whereas the presence of TctD counteracted this activation. Thus, the integration of two important environmental signals e.g. phosphate availability and the carbon source are achieved by a titration of the relative amounts of two phosphorylated RRs that inversely regulate a common subset of genes. In conclusion, our results on the PhoB and TctD mediated two-component signal transduction pathways exemplify how P. aeruginosa may exploit cross-regulation to adapt bacterial behavior to complex environments.
    • Deep transcriptome profiling of clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates reveals strain and sequence type-specific adaptation.

      Bruchmann, Sebastian; Muthukumarasamy, Uthayakumar; Pohl, Sarah; Preusse, Matthias; Bielecka, Agata; Nicolai, Tanja; Hamann, Isabell; Hillert, Roger; Kola, Axel; Gastmeier, Petra; et al. (2015-11)
      Health-care-associated infections by multi-drug-resistant bacteria constitute one of the greatest challenges to modern medicine. Bacterial pathogens devise various mechanisms to withstand the activity of a wide range of antimicrobial compounds, among which the acquisition of carbapenemases is one of the most concerning. In Klebsiella pneumoniae, the dissemination of the K. pneumoniae carbapenemase is tightly connected to the global spread of certain clonal lineages. Although antibiotic resistance is a key driver for the global distribution of epidemic high-risk clones, there seem to be other adaptive traits that may explain their success. Here, we exploited the power of deep transcriptome profiling (RNA-seq) to shed light on the transcriptomic landscape of 37 clinical K. pneumoniae isolates of diverse phylogenetic origins. We identified a large set of 3346 genes which was expressed in all isolates. While the core-transcriptome profiles varied substantially between groups of different sequence types, they were more homogenous among isolates of the same sequence type. We furthermore linked the detailed information on differentially expressed genes with the clinically relevant phenotypes of biofilm formation and bacterial virulence. This allowed for the identification of a diminished expression of biofilm-specific genes within the low biofilm producing ST258 isolates as a sequence type-specific trait.
    • The mycobacterial thioredoxin peroxidase can act as a one-cysteine peroxiredoxin.

      Trujillo, Madia; Mauri, PierLuigi; Benazzi, Louise; Comini, Marcelo; De Palma, Antonella; Flohé, Leopold; Radi, Rafael; Stehr, Matthias; Singh, Mahavir; Ursini, Fulvio; et al. (2006-07-21)
      Thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx) has been reported to dominate the defense against H(2)O(2), other hydroperoxides, and peroxynitrite at the expense of thioredoxin (Trx) B and C in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mt). By homology, the enzyme has been classified as an atypical 2-C-peroxiredoxin (Prx), with Cys(60) as the "peroxidatic" cysteine (C(P)) forming a complex catalytic center with Cys(93) as the "resolving" cysteine (C(R)). Site-directed mutagenesis confirms Cys(60) to be C(P) and Cys(80) to be catalytically irrelevant. Replacing Cys(93) with serine leads to fast inactivation as seen by conventional activity determination, which is associated with oxidation of Cys(60) to a sulfinic acid derivative. However, in comparative stopped-flow analysis, WT-MtTPx and MtTPx C93S reduce peroxynitrite and react with TrxB and -C similarly fast. Reduction of pre-oxidized WT-MtTPx and MtTPx C93S by MtTrxB is demonstrated by monitoring the redox-dependent tryptophan fluorescence of MtTrxB. Furthermore, MtTPx C93S remains stable for 10 min at a morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride-generated low flux of peroxynitrite and excess MtTrxB in a dihydrorhodamine oxidation model. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed disulfide bridges between Cys(60) and Cys(93) and between Cys(60) and Cys(80) in oxidized WT-MtTPx. Reaction of pre-oxidized WT-MtTPx and MtTPx C93S with MtTrxB C34S or MtTrxC C40S yielded dead-end intermediates in which the Trx mutants are preferentially linked via disulfide bonds to Cys(60) and never to Cys(93) of the TPx. It is concluded that neither Cys(80) nor Cys(93) is required for the catalytic cycle of the peroxidase. Instead, MtTPx can react as a 1-C-Prx with Cys(60) being the site of attack for both the oxidizing and the reducing substrate. The role of Cys(93) is likely to conserve the oxidation equivalents of the sulfenic acid state of C(P) as a disulfide bond to prevent overoxidation of Cys(60) under a restricted supply of reducing substrate.
    • Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is a Natural Ornithine Aminotransferase (rocD) Mutant and Depends on Rv2323c for Growth on Arginine.

      Hampel, Annegret; Huber, Claudia; Geffers, Robert; Spona-Friedl, Marina; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2015)
      Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a genetic repertoire for metabolic pathways, which are specific and fit to its intracellular life style. Under in vitro conditions, Mtb is known to use arginine as a nitrogen source, but the metabolic pathways for arginine utilization have not been identified. Here we show that, in the presence of arginine, Mtb upregulates a gene cluster which includes an ornithine aminotransferase (rocD) and Rv2323c, a gene of unknown function. Isotopologue analysis by using 13C- or 15N-arginine revealed that in Mtb arginine is not only used as nitrogen source but also as carbon source for the formation of amino acids, in particular of proline. Surprisingly, rocD, which is widespread in other bacteria and is part of the classical arginase pathway turned out to be naturally deleted in Mtb, but not in non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Mtb lacking Rv2323c showed a growth defect on arginine, did not produce proline from arginine, and incorporated less nitrogen derived from arginine in its core nitrogen metabolism. We conclude that the highly induced pathway for arginine utilization in Mtb differs from that of other bacteria including non-tuberculous mycobacteria, probably reflecting a specific metabolic feature of intracellular Mtb.
    • The transcriptional regulator LysG (Rv1985c) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis activates lysE (Rv1986) in a lysine-dependent manner.

      Schneefeld, Marie; Busche, Tobias; Geffers, Robert; Kalinowski, Jörn; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2017)
      The Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein encoded by the Rv1986 gene is a target for memory T cells in patients with tuberculosis, and shows strong similarities to a lysine exporter LysE of Corynebacterium glutamicum. During infection, the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis adapts its metabolism to environmental changes. In this study, we found that the expression of Rv1986 is controlled by Rv1985c. Rv1985c is located directly upstream of Rv1986 with an overlapping promoter region between both genes. Semiquantitative reverse transcription PCR using an isogenic mutant of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lacking Rv1985c showed that in the presence of lysine, Rv1985c protein positively upregulated the expression of Rv1986. RNA sequencing revealed the transcription start points for both transcripts and overlapping promoters. An inverted repeat in the center of the intergenic region was identified, and binding of Rv1985c protein to the intergenic region was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Whole transcriptome expression analysis and RNAsequencing showed downregulated transcription of ppsBCD in the Rv1985c-mutant compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, our findings characterize the regulatory network of Rv1985c in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Due to their similarity of an orthologous gene pair in Corynebacterium glutamicum, we suggest to rename Rv1985c to lysG(Mt), and Rv1986 to lysE(Mt).