• Cross talk between the response regulators PhoB and TctD allows for the integration of diverse environmental signals in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

      Bielecki, Piotr; Jensen, Vanessa; Schulze, Wiebke; Gödeke, Julia; Strehmel, Janine; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Nicolai, Tanja; Bielecka, Agata; Wille, Thorsten; Gerlach, Roman G; et al. (2015-07-27)
      Two-component systems (TCS) serve as stimulus-response coupling mechanisms to allow organisms to adapt to a variety of environmental conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes for more than 100 TCS components. To avoid unwanted cross-talk, signaling cascades are very specific, with one sensor talking to its cognate response regulator (RR). However, cross-regulation may provide means to integrate different environmental stimuli into a harmonized output response. By applying a split luciferase complementation assay, we identified a functional interaction of two RRs of the OmpR/PhoB subfamily, namely PhoB and TctD in P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional profiling, ChIP-seq analysis and a global motif scan uncovered the regulons of the two RRs as well as a quadripartite binding motif in six promoter regions. Phosphate limitation resulted in PhoB-dependent expression of the downstream genes, whereas the presence of TctD counteracted this activation. Thus, the integration of two important environmental signals e.g. phosphate availability and the carbon source are achieved by a titration of the relative amounts of two phosphorylated RRs that inversely regulate a common subset of genes. In conclusion, our results on the PhoB and TctD mediated two-component signal transduction pathways exemplify how P. aeruginosa may exploit cross-regulation to adapt bacterial behavior to complex environments.
    • Visualizing the beta interferon response in mice during infection with influenza A viruses expressing or lacking nonstructural protein 1.

      Kallfass, Carsten; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Staeheli, Peter; Department of Virology, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. (2013-06)
      The innate host defense against influenza virus is largely dependent on the type I interferon (IFN) system. However, surprisingly little is known about the cellular source of IFN in the infected lung. To clarify this question, we employed a reporter mouse that contains the firefly luciferase gene in place of the IFN-β-coding region. IFN-β-producing cells were identified either by simultaneous immunostaining of lungs for luciferase and cellular markers or by generating conditional reporter mice that express luciferase exclusively in defined cell types. Two different strains of influenza A virus were employed that either do or do not code for nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), which strongly suppresses innate immune responses of infected cells. We found that epithelial cells and lung macrophages, which represent the prime host cells for influenza viruses, showed vigorous IFN-β responses which, however, were severely reduced and delayed if the infecting virus was able to produce NS1. Interestingly, CD11c(+) cell populations that were either expressing or lacking macrophage markers produced the bulk of IFN-β at 48 h after infection with wild-type influenza A virus. Our results demonstrate that the virus-encoded IFN-antagonistic factor NS1 disarms specifically epithelial cells and lung macrophages, which otherwise would serve as main mediators of the early response against infection by influenza virus.