• Covalent Lectin Inhibition and Application in Bacterial Biofilm Imaging.

      Wagner, Stefanie; Hauck, Dirk; Hoffmann, Michael; Sommer, Roman; Joachim, Ines; Müller, Rolf; Imberty, Anne; Varrot, Annabelle; Titz, Alexander; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für pharmazeutische Forchung Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1, 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (2017-09-28)
      Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria is a hallmark of chronic infections. In many cases, lectins play key roles in establishing biofilms. The pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa often exhibiting various drug resistances employs its lectins LecA and LecB as virulence factors and biofilm building blocks. Therefore, inhibition of the function of these proteins is thought to have potential in developing "pathoblockers" preventing biofilm formation and virulence. A covalent lectin inhibitor specific to a carbohydrate binding site is described for the first time. Its application in the LecA-specific in vitro imaging of biofilms formed by P. aeruginosa is also reported.
    • Non-Carbohydrate Glycomimetics as Inhibitors of Calcium(II)-Binding Lectins.

      Kuhaudomlarp, Sakonwan; Siebs, Eike; Shanina, Elena; Topin, Jérémie; Joachim, Ines; da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Varrot, Annabelle; Rognan, Didier; Rademacher, Christoph; Imberty, Anne; et al. (Wiley-VCH, 2021-03-03)
      Because of the antimicrobial resistance crisis, lectins are considered novel drug targets. Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes LecA and LecB in the infection process. Inhibition of both lectins with carbohydrate-derived molecules can reduce biofilm formation to restore antimicrobial susceptibility. Here, we focused on non-carbohydrate inhibitors for LecA to explore new avenues for lectin inhibition. From a screening cascade we obtained one experimentally confirmed hit, a catechol, belonging to the well-known PAINS compounds. Rigorous analyses validated electron-deficient catechols as millimolar LecA inhibitors. The first co-crystal structure of a non-carbohydrate inhibitor in complex with a bacterial lectin clearly demonstrates the catechol mimicking the binding of natural glycosides with LecA. Importantly, catechol 3 is the first non-carbohydrate lectin ligand that binds bacterial and mammalian calcium(II)-binding lectins, giving rise to this fundamentally new class of glycomimetics.
    • Overcoming the unexpected functional inversion of a PqsR antagonist in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an in vivo potent antivirulence agent targeting pqs quorum sensing.

      Lu, Cenbin; Maurer, Christine K; Kirsch, Benjamin; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W; Division of Drug design and optimization. Helmholtz-Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland & Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Saarland University. (2014-01-20)
      The virulence regulator PqsR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is considered as an attractive target for attenuating the bacterial pathogenicity without eliciting resistance. However, despite efforts and desires, no promising PqsR antagonist has been discovered thus far. Now, a surprising functionality change of a highly affine PqsR antagonist in P. aeruginosa is revealed, which is mediated by a bacterial signal molecule synthase and responsible for low cellular potency. Blockade of the susceptible position led to the discovery of the first antivirulence compound that is potent in vivo and targets PqsR, thus providing a proof of concept for this novel antivirulence therapy.
    • Squalenyl Hydrogen Sulfate Nanoparticles for Simultaneous Delivery of Tobramycin and an Alkylquinolone Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Enable the Eradication of P. aeruginosa Biofilm Infections.

      Ho, Duy-Khiet; Murgia, Xabier; de Rossi, Chiara; Christmann, Rebekka; Hüfner de Mello Martins, Antonio G; Koch, Marcus; Andreas, Anastasia; Herrmann, Jennifer; Müller, Rolf; Empting, Martin; et al. (Wiley, 2020-04-03)
      Elimination of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infections is challenging to accomplish with antibiotic therapies, mainly due to resistance mechanisms. Quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) interfering with biofilm formation can thus complement antibiotics. For simultaneous and improved delivery of both active agents to the infection sites, self-assembling nanoparticles of a newly synthesized squalenyl hydrogen sulfate (SqNPs) were prepared. These nanocarriers allowed for remarkably high loading capacities of hydrophilic antibiotic tobramycin (Tob) and a novel lipophilic QSI at 30 % and circa 10 %, respectively. The drug-loaded SqNPs showed improved biofilm penetration and enhanced efficacy in relevant biological barriers (mucin/human tracheal mucus, biofilm), leading to complete eradication of PA biofilms at circa 16-fold lower Tob concentration than Tob alone. This study offers a viable therapy optimization and invigorates the research and development of QSIs for clinical use.