• Attaching and effacing pathogens: the effector ABC of immune subversion.

      Riebisch, Anna Katharina; Mühlen, Sabrina; BRICS, Braunschweiger Zentrum für Systembiologie, Rebenring 56,38106 Braunschweig, Germany. (Future Medicine Ltd., 2020-07-27)
      The innate immune response resembles an essential barrier to bacterial infection. Many bacterial pathogens have, therefore, evolved mechanisms to evade from or subvert the host immune response in order to colonize, survive and multiply. The attaching and effacing pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, enterohaemorrhagic E. coli, Escherichia albertii and Citrobacter rodentium are Gram-negative extracellular gastrointestinal pathogens. They use a type III secretion system to inject effector proteins into the host cell to manipulate a variety of cellular processes. Over the last decade, considerable progress was made in identifying and characterizing the effector proteins of attaching and effacing pathogens that are involved in the inhibition of innate immune signaling pathways, in determining their host cell targets and elucidating the mechanisms they employ. Their functions will be reviewed here.
    • [The contribution of epidemiological models to the description of the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic].

      Priesemann, Viola; Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Pigeot, Iris; Schöbel, Anita; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Springer, 2021-07-30)
      After the global outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, an infection dynamic of immense extent developed. Since then, numerous measures have been taken to bring the infection under control. This was very successful in the spring of 2020, while the number of infections rose sharply the following autumn. To predict the occurrence of infections, epidemiological models are used. These are in principle a very valuable tool in pandemic management. However, they still partly need to be based on assumptions regarding the transmission routes and possible drivers of the infection dynamics. Despite numerous individual approaches, systematic epidemiological data are still lacking with which, for example, the effectiveness of individual measures could be quantified. Such information generated in studies is needed to enable reliable predictions regarding the further course of the pandemic. Thereby, the complexity of the models could develop hand in hand with the complexity of the available data. In this article, after delineating two basic classes of models, the contribution of epidemiological models to the assessment of various central aspects of the pandemic, such as the reproduction rate, the number of unreported cases, infection fatality rate, and the consideration of regionality, is shown. Subsequently, the use of the models to quantify the impact of measures and the effects of the "test-trace-isolate" strategy is described. In the concluding discussion, the limitations of such modelling approaches are juxtaposed with their advantages.