• Exploitation of prokaryotic expression systems based on the salicylate-dependent control circuit encompassing nahR/P(sal)::xylS2 for biotechnological applications.

      Becker, Pablo D; Royo, Jose L; Guzman, Carlos A; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2017-02-15)
      Expression vectors appear to be an indispensable tool for both biological studies and biotechnological applications. Controlling gene overexpression becomes a critical issue when protein production is desired. In addition to several aspects regarding toxicity or plasmid instability, tight control of gene expression is an essential factor in biotechnological processes. Thus, the search for better-controlled circuits is an important issue among biotechnologists. Traditionally, expression systems involve a single regulatory protein operating over a target promoter. However, these circuits are limited on their induction ratios (e.g., by their restriction in the maximal expression capacity, by their leakiness under non-induced conditions). Due to these limitations, regulatory cascades, which are far more efficient, are necessary for biotechnological applications. Thus, regulatory circuits with two modules operating in cascade offer a significant advantage. In this review, we describe the regulatory cascade based on two salicylate-responsive transcriptional regulators of Pseudomonas putida (nahR/P(sal)::xylS2), its properties, and contribution to a tighter control over heterologous gene expression in different applications.Nowadays, heterologous expression has been proven to be an indispensable tool for tackling basic biological questions, as well as for developing biotechnological applications. As the nature of the protein of interest becomes more complex, biotechnologists find that a tight control of gene expression is a key factor which conditions the success of the downstream purification process, as well as the interpretation of the results in other type of studies. Fortunately, different expression systems can be found in the market, each of them with their own pros and cons. In this review we discuss the exploitation of prokaryotic expression systems based on a promising expression system, the salicylate-dependent control circuit encompassing nahR/P(sal)::xylS2, as well as some of the improvements that have been done on this system to exploit it more efficiently in the context of both biotechnological applications and basic research.