• Biogenic and Biomimetic Carriers as Versatile Transporters To Treat Infections.

      Goes, Adriely; Fuhrmann, Gregor; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (American Chemical Society, 2018-03-29)
      Biogenic and biomimetic therapeutics are a relatively new class of systems that are of physiological origin and/or take advantage of natural pathways or aim at mimicking these to improve selective interaction with target tissue. The number of biogenic and bioengineered avenues for drug therapy and diagnostics has multiplied over the past years for many applications, indicating the high expectations associated with this biological route. Nevertheless, the use of "bio"-related approaches for treating or diagnosing infectious diseases is still rare. Given that infectious diseases, in particular bacterial resistances, are seriously on the rise, there is an urgent need to take advantage of biogenic and bioengineered systems to target these challenges. In this manuscript, we first give a definition of the various "bio" terms, including biogenic, biomimetic, bioinspired, and bioengineered and we highlight them using tangible applications in the field of infectious diseases. Our examples cover cell-derived systems, including bioengineered bacteria, virus-like particles, and different cell-mimetics. Moreover, we discuss natural and bioengineered particles such as extracellular vesicles from mammalian and bacterial sources and liposomes. A concluding section outlines the potential for biomaterial-related avenues to overcome challenges associated with difficult-to-treat infections. We critically discuss benefits and risks for these applications and give an outlook on the future of biogenic engineering.
    • Hot EVs - how temperature affects extracellular vesicles.

      Schulz, Eilien; Karagianni, Anna; Koch, Marcus; Fuhrmann, Gregor; HIPS, Helmholtz-Institut für Pharmazeutische Forschung Saarland, Universitätscampus E8.1 66123 Saarbrücken, Germany. (Elsevier, 2019-12-02)
      In recent years, extracellular vesicles (EVs) and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) have become an extensive and diverse field of research. They hold potential as diagnostic markers, therapeutics and for fundamental biological understanding. Despite ongoing studies, numerous information regarding function, content and stability of EVs remains unclear. If EVs and OMVs ought to be used as therapeutics and in clinical environments, their stability is one of the most important factors to be considered. Especially for formulation development, EVs and OMVs need to be stable at higher temperatures. To the best of our knowledge, very little work has been published regarding heat stability of neither EVs nor OMVs. In the present study, we investigated B lymphoblastoid cell-derived EVs and OMVs derived from myxobacterial species Sorangiineae as model vesicles. We exposed the vesicles to 37 °C, 50 °C, 70 °C and 100 °C for 1 h, 6 h and 24 h, and also autoclaved them. Interestingly, physico-chemical analyses such as size, particle concentration and protein concentration showed minor alterations, particularly at 37 °C. Flow cytometry analysis emphasised these results suggesting that after heat impact, EVs and OMVs were still able to be taken up by macrophage-like dTHP-1 cells. These data indicate that both mammalian and bacterial vesicles show intrinsic stability at physiological temperature. Our findings are important to consider for vesicle formulation and for advanced bioengineering approaches.
    • Myxobacteria-Derived Outer Membrane Vesicles: Potential Applicability Against Intracellular Infections.

      Goes, Adriely; Lapuhs, Philipp; Kuhn, Thomas; Schulz, Eilien; Richter, Robert; Panter, Fabian; Dahlem, Charlotte; Koch, Marcus; Garcia, Ronald; Kiemer, Alexandra K; et al. (MDPI, 2020-01-12)
      In 2019, it was estimated that 2.5 million people die from lower tract respiratory infections annually. One of the main causes of these infections is Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterium that can invade and survive within mammalian cells. S. aureus intracellular infections are difficult to treat because several classes of antibiotics are unable to permeate through the cell wall and reach the pathogen. This condition increases the need for new therapeutic avenues, able to deliver antibiotics efficiently. In this work, we obtained outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) derived from the myxobacteria Cystobacter velatus strain Cbv34 and Cystobacter ferrugineus strain Cbfe23, that are naturally antimicrobial, to target intracellular infections, and investigated how they can affect the viability of epithelial and macrophage cell lines. We evaluated by cytometric bead array whether they induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in blood immune cells. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry, we also investigated their interaction and uptake into mammalian cells. Finally, we studied the effect of OMVs on planktonic and intracellular S. aureus. We found that while Cbv34 OMVs were not cytotoxic to cells at any concentration tested, Cbfe23 OMVs affected the viability of macrophages, leading to a 50% decrease at a concentration of 125,000 OMVs/cell. We observed only little to moderate stimulation of release of TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL-6 and IL-1beta by both OMVs. Cbfe23 OMVs have better interaction with the cells than Cbv34 OMVs, being taken up faster by them, but both seem to remain mostly on the cell surface after 24 h of incubation. This, however, did not impair their bacteriostatic activity against intracellular S. aureus. In this study, we provide an important basis for implementing OMVs in the treatment of intracellular infections.