• Seven New Cytotoxic and Antimicrobial Xanthoquinodins from Jugulospora vestita.

      Shao, Lulu; Marin-Felix, Yasmina; Surup, Frank; Stchigel, Alberto M; Stadler, Marc; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-09-25)
      During the course of a screening for novel biologically active secondary metabolites produced by the Sordariomycetes (Ascomycota, Fungi), the ex-type strain of Jugulospora vestita was found to produce seven novel xanthone-anthraquinone heterodimers, xanthoquinodin A11 (1) and xanthoquinodins B10-15 (2-7), together with the already known compound xanthoquinodin B4 (8). The structures of the xanthoquinodins were determined by analysis of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic and mass spectrometric data. Moreover, the absolute configurations of these metabolites were established by analysis of the 1H-1H coupling constants, nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) correlations, and Electronic Circular Dichroism (ECD) spectroscopic data. Antifungal and antibacterial activities as well as cytotoxicity of all compounds were tested. Xanthoquinodin B11 showed fungicidal activities against Mucor hiemalis [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 2.1 µg/mL], Rhodotorula glutinis (MIC 2.1 µg/mL), and Pichia anomala (MIC 8.3 µg/mL). All the compounds 1-8 displayed anti-Gram-positive bacteria activity (MIC 0.2-8.3 µg/mL). In addition, all these eight compounds showed cytotoxicity against KB 3.1, L929, A549, SK-OV-3, PC-3, A431, and MCF-7 mammalian cell lines. The six novel compounds (1-3, 5-7), together with xanthoquinodin B4, were also found in the screening of other strains belonging to Jugulospora rotula, revealing the potential chemotaxonomic significance of the compound class for the genus.
    • Amidochelocardin Overcomes Resistance Mechanisms Exerted on Tetracyclines and Natural Chelocardin.

      Hennessen, Fabienne; Miethke, Marcus; Zaburannyi, Nestor; Loose, Maria; Lukežič, Tadeja; Bernecker, Steffen; Hüttel, Stephan; Jansen, Rolf; Schmiedel, Judith; Fritzenwanker, Moritz; et al. (MDPI, 2020-09-18)
      The reassessment of known but neglected natural compounds is a vital strategy for providing novel lead structures urgently needed to overcome antimicrobial resistance. Scaffolds with resistance-breaking properties represent the most promising candidates for a successful translation into future therapeutics. Our study focuses on chelocardin, a member of the atypical tetracyclines, and its bioengineered derivative amidochelocardin, both showing broad-spectrum antibacterial activity within the ESKAPE (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) panel. Further lead development of chelocardins requires extensive biological and chemical profiling to achieve favorable pharmaceutical properties and efficacy. This study shows that both molecules possess resistance-breaking properties enabling the escape from most common tetracycline resistance mechanisms. Further, we show that these compounds are potent candidates for treatment of urinary tract infections due to their in vitro activity against a large panel of multidrug-resistant uropathogenic clinical isolates. In addition, the mechanism of resistance to natural chelocardin was identified as relying on efflux processes, both in the chelocardin producer Amycolatopsis sulphurea and in the pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae. Resistance development in Klebsiella led primarily to mutations in ramR, causing increased expression of the acrAB-tolC efflux pump. Most importantly, amidochelocardin overcomes this resistance mechanism, revealing not only the improved activity profile but also superior resistance-breaking properties of this novel antibacterial compound.
    • Molecular Phylogeny and Morphology of (=Lepteutypa ) (Amphisphaeriaceae).

      Samarakoon, Milan C; Maharachchikumbura, Sajeewa S N; Liu, Jian-Kui Jack; Hyde, Kevin D; Promputtha, Itthayakorn; Stadler, Marc; HZI, Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung, GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-09-17)
      Amphisphaeriaceous taxa (fungi) are saprobes on decaying wood in terrestrial, mangrove, and freshwater habitats. The generic boundaries of the family have traditionally been based on morphology, and the delimitation of genera has always been challenging. Amphisphaeria species have clypeate ascomata and 1-septate ascospores and a coelomycetous asexual morph. Lepteutypa is different from Amphisphaeria in having eutypoid stromata and more than 1-septate ascospores. These main characters have been used for segregation of Lepteutypa from Amphisphaeria for a long time. However, the above characters are overlapping among Amphisphaeria and Lepteutypa species. Therefore, here we synonymized Lepteutypa under Amphisphaeria based on holomorphic morphology and multigene phylogeny. Further, our cluster analysis reveals the relationship between seven morphological traits among Amphisphaeria/Lepteutypa species and suggests those morphologies are not specific to either genus. Three new species (i.e., Amphisphaeria camelliae, A. curvaticonidia, and A. micheliae) are introduced based on morphology and LSU-ITS-RPB2-TUB2 phylogenies. Furthermore, the monotypic genus Trochilispora, which had been accepted in Amphisphaeriaceae, is revisited and synonymized under Hymenopleella and placed in Sporocadaceae.
    • Re-Evaluation of the Order Sordariales: Delimitation of Lasiosphaeriaceae s. str., and Introduction of the New Families Diplogelasinosporaceae, Naviculisporaceae, and Schizotheciaceae.

      Marin-Felix, Yasmina; Miller, Andrew N; Cano-Lira, José F; Guarro, Josep; García, D; Stadler, Marc; Huhndorf, Sabine M; Stchigel, Alberto M; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-09-17)
      The order Sordariales includes the polyphyletic family Lasiosphaeriaceae, which comprises approximately 30 genera characterized by its paraphysate ascomata, asci with apical apparati, and mostly two-celled ascospores, which have a dark apical cell and a hyaline lower cell, frequently ornamented with mucilaginous appendages[...].
    • Phylogenetic Assignment of the Fungicolous (Ascomycota, Xylariales) and Investigation of its Secondary Metabolites.

      Becker, Kevin; Lambert, Christopher; Wieschhaus, Jörg; Stadler, Marc; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-09-11)
      The ascomycete Hypoxylon invadens was described in 2014 as a fungicolous species growing on a member of its own genus, H.fragiforme, which is considered a rare lifestyle in the Hypoxylaceae. This renders H.invadens an interesting target in our efforts to find new bioactive secondary metabolites from members of the Xylariales. So far, only volatile organic compounds have been reported from H.invadens, but no investigation of non-volatile compounds had been conducted. Furthermore, a phylogenetic assignment following recent trends in fungal taxonomy via a multiple sequence alignment seemed practical. A culture of H.invadens was thus subjected to submerged cultivation to investigate the produced secondary metabolites, followed by isolation via preparative chromatography and subsequent structure elucidation by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). This approach led to the identification of the known flaviolin (1) and 3,3-biflaviolin (2) as the main components, which had never been reported from the order Xylariales before. Assessment of their antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects via a panel of commonly used microorganisms and cell lines in our laboratory did not yield any effects of relevance. Concurrently, genomic DNA from the fungus was used to construct a multigene phylogeny using ribosomal sequence information from the internal transcribed spacer region (ITS), the 28S large subunit of ribosomal DNA (LSU), and proteinogenic nucleotide sequences from the second largest subunit of the DNA-directed RNA polymerase II (RPB2) and β-tubulin (TUB2) genes. A placement in a newly formed clade with H.trugodes was strongly supported in a maximum-likelihood (ML) phylogeny using sequences derived from well characterized strains, but the exact position of said clade remains unclear. Both, the chemical and the phylogenetic results suggest further inquiries into the lifestyle of this unique fungus to get a better understanding of both, its ecological role and function of its produced secondary metabolites hitherto unique to the Xylariales.
    • Phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic studies confirm the affinities of Stromatoneurospora phoenix to the Coprophilous xylariaceae

      Becker, Kevin; Wongkanoun, Sarunyou; Wessel, Anna Charleen; Bills, Gerald F.; Stadler, Marc; Luangsa-ard, J. Jennifer; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-09-01)
      The genus Stromatoneurospora was erected in 1973 by Jong and Davis to accommodate the pyrophilic pyrenomycete Sphaeria phoenix and has traditionally been placed in the family Xylariaceae based on morphological features. However, no living culture of this genus has so far been available in the public domain. Molecular data were restricted to an internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence that only confirmed the familial position, and was generated from a strain that is not deposited in a public culture collection. We have recently collected fresh material and were able to culture this fungus from Thailand. The secondary metabolites of this strains were analysed after fermentation in multiple media. The the prominent components of these fermentation were purified, using preparative chromatography. Aside from two new eremophilane sesquiterpenoids named phoenixilanes A-B (1-2), four other components that are known from species of the xylariaceous genera Xylaria and Poronia were identified by spectral methods (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry). Notably, (-)-(R)-6-hydroxy-3-methyl-4-dihydroisocoumarin-5-carboxylic acid (6) has not been reported as a natural product before. Moreover, DNA sequences of Stromatoneurospora phoenix clustered with members of the genera Poronia and Podosordaria in a multi-locus molecular phylogeny. These results confirmed that the genus belongs to the same evolutionary lineage as the coprophilic Xylariaceae. The results also suggest that this lineage has evolved independently from the plant-inhabiting saprotrophs and endophytes that are closely related to the genus Xylaria. These findings are discussed in relation to some theories about the endophytic vs. the pyrophilic/coprophilic fungal life style.
    • Microfungi associated with Clematis (Ranunculaceae) with an integrated approach to delimiting species boundaries

      Phukhamsakda, Chayanard; McKenzie, Eric H. C.; Phillips, Alan J. L.; Gareth Jones, E. B.; Jayarama Bhat, D.; Stadler, Marc; Bhunjun, Chitrabhanu S.; Wanasinghe, Dhanushka N.; Thongbai, Benjarong; Camporesi, Erio; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-07-07)
      The cosmopolitan plant genus Clematis contains many climbing species that can be found worldwide. The genus occurs in the wild and is grown commercially for horticulture. Microfungi on Clematis were collected from Belgium, China, Italy, Thailand and the UK. They are characterized by morphology and analyses of gene sequence data using an integrated species concept to validate identifications. The study revealed two new families, 12 new genera, 50 new species, 26 new host records with one dimorphic character report, and ten species are transferred to other genera. The new families revealed by multigene phylogeny are Longiostiolaceae and Pseudomassarinaceae in Pleosporales (Dothideomycetes). New genera are Anthodidymella (Didymellaceae), Anthosulcatispora and Parasulcatispora (Sulcatisporaceae), Fusiformispora (Amniculicolaceae), Longispora (Phaeosphaeriaceae), Neobyssosphaeria (Melanommataceae), Neoleptosporella (Chaetosphaeriales, genera incertae sedis), Neostictis (Stictidaceae), Pseudohelminthosporium (Neomassarinaceae), Pseudomassarina (Pseudomassarinaceae), Sclerenchymomyces (Leptosphaeriaceae) and Xenoplectosphaerella (Plectosphaerellaceae). The newly described species are Alloleptosphaeria clematidis, Anthodidymella ranunculacearum, Anthosulcatispora subglobosa, Aquadictyospora clematidis, Brunneofusispora clematidis, Chaetosphaeronema clematidicola, C. clematidis, Chromolaenicola clematidis, Diaporthe clematidina, Dictyocheirospora clematidis, Distoseptispora clematidis, Floricola clematidis, Fusiformispora clematidis, Hermatomyces clematidis, Leptospora clematidis, Longispora clematidis, Massariosphaeria clematidis, Melomastia clematidis, M. fulvicomae, Neobyssosphaeria clematidis, Neoleptosporella clematidis, Neoroussoella clematidis, N. fulvicomae, Neostictis nigricans, Neovaginatispora clematidis, Parasulcatispora clematidis, Parathyridaria clematidis, P. serratifoliae, P. virginianae, Periconia verrucose, Phomatospora uniseriata, Pleopunctum clematidis, Pseudocapulatispora clematidis, Pseudocoleophoma clematidis, Pseudohelminthosporium clematidis, Pseudolophiostoma chiangraiense, P. clematidis, Pseudomassarina clematidis, Ramusculicola clematidis, Sarocladium clematidis, Sclerenchymomyces clematidis, Sigarispora clematidicola, S. clematidis, S. montanae, Sordaria clematidis, Stemphylium clematidis, Wojnowiciella clematidis, Xenodidymella clematidis, Xenomassariosphaeria clematidis and Xenoplectosphaerella clematidis. The following fungi are recorded on Clematis species for the first time: Angustimassarina rosarum, Dendryphion europaeum, Dermatiopleospora mariae, Diaporthe ravennica, D. rudis, Dichotomopilus ramosissimum, Dictyocheirospora xishuangbannaensis, Didymosphaeria rubi-ulmifolii, Fitzroyomyces cyperacearum, Fusarium celtidicola, Leptospora thailandica, Memnoniella oblongispora, Neodidymelliopsis longicolla, Neoeutypella baoshanensis, Neoroussoella heveae, Nigrograna chromolaenae, N. obliqua, Pestalotiopsis verruculosa, Pseudoberkleasmium chiangmaiense, Pseudoophiobolus rosae, Pseudoroussoella chromolaenae, P. elaeicola, Ramusculicola thailandica, Stemphylium vesicarium and Torula chromolaenae. The new combinations are Anthodidymella clematidis (≡ Didymella clematidis), A. vitalbina (≡ Didymella vitalbina), Anthosulcatispora brunnea (≡ Neobambusicola brunnea), Fuscohypha kunmingensis (≡ Plectosphaerella kunmingensis), Magnibotryascoma rubriostiolata (≡ Teichospora rubriostiolata), Pararoussoella mangrovei (≡ Roussoella mangrovei), Pseudoneoconiothyrium euonymi (≡ Roussoella euonymi), Sclerenchymomyces jonesii (≡ Neoleptosphaeria jonesii), Stemphylium rosae (≡ Pleospora rosae), and S. rosae-caninae (≡ Pleospora rosae-caninae). The microfungi on Clematis is distributed in several classes of Ascomycota. The analyses are based on morphological examination of specimens, coupled with phylogenetic sequence data. To the best of our knowledge, the consolidated species concept approach is recommended in validating species.
    • The planctomycete Stieleria maiorica Mal15 employs stieleriacines to alter the species composition in marine biofilms.

      Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Jeske, Olga; Sandargo, Birthe; Boedeker, Christian; Wiegand, Sandra; Bartling, Pascal; Jogler, Mareike; Rohde, Manfred; Petersen, Jörn; Medema, Marnix H; et al. (Nature publishing group(NPG), 2020-06-12)
      Bacterial strains of the phylum Planctomycetes occur ubiquitously, but are often found on surfaces of aquatic phototrophs, e.g. alga. Despite slower growth, planctomycetes are not outcompeted by faster-growing bacteria in biofilms on such surfaces; however, strategies allowing them to compensate for slower growth have not yet been investigated. Here, we identified stieleriacines, a class of N-acylated tyrosines produced by the novel planctomycete Stieleria maiorica Mal15T, and analysed their effects on growth of the producing strain and bacterial species likely co-occurring with strain Mal15T. Stieleriacines reduced the lag phase of Mal15T and either stimulated or inhibited biofilm formation of two bacterial competitors, indicating that Mal15T employs stieleriacines to specifically alter microbial biofilm composition. The genetic organisation of the putative stieleriacine biosynthetic cluster in strain Mal15T points towards a functional link of stieleriacine biosynthesis to exopolysaccharide-associated protein sorting and biofilm formation.
    • Viridistratins A-C, Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Benzo[]fluoranthenes from Stromata of (Hypoxylaceae, Ascomycota).

      Becker, Kevin; Wessel, Anna-Charleen; Luangsa-Ard, J Jennifer; Stadler, Marc; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-05-23)
      During the course of our search for novel biologically active metabolites from tropical fungi, we are using chemotaxonomic and taxonomic methodology for the preselection of interesting materials. Recently, three previously undescribed benzo[j]fluoranthenes (1-3) together with the known derivatives truncatones A and C (4, 5) were isolated from the stromata of the recently described species Annulohypoxylon viridistratum collected in Thailand. Their chemical structures were elucidated by means of spectral methods, including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS). The new compounds, for which we propose the trivial names viridistratins A-C, exhibited weak-to-moderate antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities in cell-based assays.
    • Discovery of a new species of the Hypoxylon rubiginosum complex from Iran and antagonistic activities of spp. against the Ash Dieback pathogen, Hymenoscyphus fraxineus,, in dual culture.

      Pourmoghaddam, Mohammad Javad; Lambert, Christopher; Surup, Frank; Khodaparast, Seyed Akbar; Krisai-Greilhuber, Irmgard; Voglmayr, Hermann; Stadler, Marc; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (PenSoft Publishers, 2020-04-24)
      During a survey of xylarialean fungi in Northern Iran, several specimens that showed affinities to the Hypoxylon rubiginosum complex were collected and cultured. A comparison of their morphological characters, combined with a chemotaxonomic study based on high performance liquid chromatography, coupled with diode array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD/MS) and a multi-locus phylogeny based on ITS, LSU, rbp2 and tub2 DNA sequences, revealed a new species here described as Hypoxylon guilanense. In addition, Hypoxylon rubiginosumsensu stricto was also encountered. Concurrently, an endophytic isolate of the latter species showed strong antagonistic activities against the Ash Dieback pathogen, Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, in a dual culture assay in our laboratory. Therefore, we decided to test the new Iranian fungi for antagonistic activities against the pathogen, along with several cultures of other Hypoxylon species that are related to H. rubiginosum. Our results suggest that the antagonistic effects of Hypoxylon spp. against Hym. fraxineus are widespread and that they are due to the production of antifungal phomopsidin derivatives in the presence of the pathogen.
    • Polyketide-Derived Secondary Metabolites from a Dothideomycetes Fungus, . et . ., (Muyocopronales) with Antimicrobial and Cytotoxic Activities.

      Mapook, Ausana; Macabeo, Allan Patrick G; Thongbai, Benjarong; Hyde, Kevin D; Stadler, Marc; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-04-08)
      Pseudopalawania siamensisgen. et sp. nov., from northern Thailand, is introduced based on multi-gene analyses and morphological comparison. An isolate was fermented in yeast malt culture broth and explored for its secondary metabolite production. Chromatographic purification of the crude ethyl acetate (broth) extract yielded four tetrahydroxanthones comprised of a new heterodimeric bistetrahydroxanthone, pseudopalawanone (1), two known dimeric derivatives, 4,4'-secalonic acid D (2) and penicillixanthone A (3), the corresponding monomeric tetrahydroxanthone paecilin B (4), and the known benzophenone, cephalanone F (5). Compounds 1-3 showed potent inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Compounds 2 and 3 were inhibitory against Bacillus subtilis with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 1.0 and 4.2 μg/mL, respectively. Only compound 2 showed activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis. In addition, the dimeric compounds 1-3 also showed moderate cytotoxic effects on HeLa and mouse fibroblast cell lines, which makes them less attractive as candidates for development of selectively acting antibiotics.
    • Special issue: The contributions of Erio Camporesi

      Phukhamsakda, Chayanard; Wijayawardene, Nalin N.; Ariyawansa, Hiran A.; Senanayake, Indunil C.; Li, Wen-Jing; Wanasinghe, Dhanushka N.; Phookamsak, Rungtiwa; Tian, Qing; Daranagama, Dinushani A.; Thambugala, Kasun M.; et al. (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-03-23)
      [No abstract available]
    • New Peptaibiotics and a Cyclodepsipeptide from : Isolation, Identification, Cytotoxic and Nematicidal Activities.

      Moussa, Ashaimaa Y; Lambert, Christopher; Stradal, Theresia E B; Ashrafi, Samad; Maier, Wolfgang; Stadler, Marc; Helaly, Soleiman E; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-03-22)
      Fungal associations with nematodes have attracted scientific attention because of the need to develop new biocontrol agents. In this context, Ijuhya vitellina, an antagonistic fungus previously isolated from the plant parasitic cyst nematode Heterodera filipjevi, was selected to carry out an in-depth metabolomic study for its active metabolites. Herein, three new nonapeptide peptaibols with leucinostatin based sequences were isolated and identified by 1, 2D NMR, and HR-ESI-MS-MS. The absolute configuration was assigned based on Marfay's analysis and Mosher ester formation. The new leucinostatins manifested moderate nematicidal effect against the plant pathogenic nematode Pratylenchus penetrans with LD90 values ranging from 5 to 7 µg/mL. Furthermore, a cyclodepsipeptide, named arthrichitin D, with five amino acid residues attached to a 3-hydroxy-2,4-dimethylhexadeca-4,6-dienoic fatty acid chain was discovered and showed weak nematicidal effect against Caenorhabditis elegans. Chaetoglobosin B and its 19-O-acetyl derivative were also obtained as minor metabolites, and the activity of chaetoglobosin B on the actin cytoskeleton of mammalian cells was assessed.
    • Labyrinthopeptins as virolytic inhibitors of respiratory syncytial virus cell entry.

      Blockus, Sebastian; Sake, Svenja M; Wetzke, Martin; Grethe, Christina; Graalmann, Theresa; Pils, Marina; Le Goffic, Ronan; Galloux, Marie; Prochnow, Hans; Rox, Katharina; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-03-18)
      Acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI) caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are associated with a severe disease burden among infants and elderly patients. Treatment options are limited. While numerous drug candidates with different viral targets are under development, the utility of RSV entry inhibitors is challenged by a low resistance barrier and by single mutations causing cross-resistance against a wide spectrum of fusion inhibitor chemotypes. We developed a cell-based screening assay for discovery of compounds inhibiting infection with primary RSV isolates. Using this system, we identified labyrinthopeptin A1 and A2 (Laby A1/A2), lantibiotics isolated from Actinomadura namibiensis, as effective RSV cell entry inhibitors with IC50s of 0.39 μM and 4.97 μM, respectively, and with favourable therapeutic index (>200 and > 20, respectively). Both molecules were active against multiple RSV strains including primary isolates and their antiviral activity against RSV was confirmed in primary human airway cells ex vivo and a murine model in vivo. Laby A1/A2 were antiviral in prophylactic and therapeutic treatment regimens and displayed synergistic activity when applied in combination with each other. Mechanistic studies showed that Laby A1/A2 exert virolytic activity likely by binding to phosphatidylethanolamine moieties within the viral membrane and by disrupting virus particle membrane integrity. Probably due to its specific mode of action, Laby A1/A2 antiviral activity was not affected by common resistance mutations to known RSV entry inhibitors. Taken together, Laby A1/A2 represent promising candidates for development as RSV inhibitors. Moreover, the cell-based screening system with primary RSV isolates described here should be useful to identify further antiviral agents.
    • Nonocarbolines A-E, -Carboline Antibiotics Produced by the Rare Actinobacterium sp. from Indonesia.

      Primahana, Gian; Risdian, Chandra; Mozef, Tjandrawati; Sudarman, Enge; Köck, Matthias; Wink, Joachim; Stadler, Marc; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-03-17)
      During the course of our ongoing screening for novel biologically active secondary metabolites, the rare Actinobacterium, Nonomuraea sp. 1808210CR was found to produce five unprecedented β-carboline derivatives, nonocarbolines A-E (1-5). Their structures were elucidated from high-resolution mass spectrometry, 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the absolute configuration of 4 was determined by using the modified Mosher method. Nonocarboline B (2) displayed moderate antifungal activity against Mucor hiemalis, while nonocarboline D (4) exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against the human lung carcinoma cell line A-549 with the IC50 value of 1.7 µM.
    • Formaldehyde as a Chemical Defence Agent of Fruiting Bodies of Mycena rosea and its Role in the Generation of the Alkaloid Mycenarubin C

      Himstedt, Rieke; Wagner, Silke; Jaeger, Robert J. R.; Lieunang Watat, Michèle‐Laure; Backenköhler, Jana; Rupcic, Zeljka; Stadler, Marc; Spiteller, Peter; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Wiley, 2020-03-13)
      Mycenarubin C, a previously unknown red pyrroloquinoline alkaloid, was isolated from fruiting bodies of the mushroom Mycena rosea and its structure was elucidated mainly by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Unlike mycenarubin A, the major pyrroloquinoline alkaloid in fruiting bodies of M. rosea, mycenarubin C, contains an eight-membered ring with an additional C1 unit that is hitherto unprecedented for pyrroloquinoline alkaloids known in nature. Incubation of mycenarubin A with an excess of formaldehyde revealed that mycenarubin C was generated nearly quantitatively from mycenarubin A. An investigation into the formaldehyde content of fresh fruiting bodies of M. rosea showed the presence of considerable amounts of formaldehyde, with values of 5 μg per gram of fresh weight in fresh fruiting bodies. Although mycenarubin C did not show bioactivity against selected bacteria and fungi, formaldehyde inhibits the growth of the mycoparasite Spinellus fusiger at concentrations present in fruiting bodies of M. rosea. Therefore, formaldehyde might play an ecological role in the chemical defence of M. rosea against S. fusiger. In turn, S. fusiger produces gallic acid-presumably to detoxify formaldehyde by reaction of this aldehyde with amino acids and gallic acid to Mannich
    • Haprolid Inhibits Tumor Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Rb/E2F and Akt/mTOR Inhibition.

      Xing, Jun; Bhuria, Vikas; Bui, Khac Cuong; Nguyen, Mai Ly Thi; Hu, Zexi; Hsieh, Chih-Jen; Wittstein, Kathrin; Stadler, Marc; Wilkens, Ludwig; Li, Jun; et al. (MDPI, 2020-03-06)
      The efficacy of haprolid was evaluated in human HCC cell lines (Huh-7, Hep3B and HepG2) and xenograft tumors (NMRI-Foxn1nu mice with injection of Hep3B cells). Cytotoxic activity of haprolid was determined by the WST-1 and crystal violet assay. Wound healing, transwell and tumorsphere assays were performed to investigate migration and invasion of HCC cells. Apoptosis and cell-cycle distribution were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of haprolid on the Rb/E2F and Akt/mTOR pathway were examined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry.
    • The Biomolecular Spectrum Drives Microbial Biology and Functions in Agri-Food-Environments.

      Sharma, Minaxi; Singh, Dhananjaya Pratap; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S; Stadler, Marc; Mishra, Pradeep Kumar; Silva, Roberto Nascimento; Prasad, Ram; Gupta, Vijai Kumar; HZI, Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-03-04)
      Microbial biomolecules have huge commercial and industrial potential. In nature, biological interactions are mostly associated with biochemical and biological diversity, especially with the discovery of associated biomolecules from microbes. Within cellular or subcellular systems, biomolecules signify the actual statuses of the microorganisms. Understanding the biological prospecting of the diverse microbial community and their complexities and communications with the environment forms a vital basis for active, innovative biotechnological breakthroughs. Biochemical diversity rather than the specific chemicals that has the utmost biological importance. The identification and quantification of the comprehensive biochemical diversity of the microbial molecules, which generally consequences in a diversity of biological functions, has significant biotechnological potential. Beneficial microbes and their biomolecules of interest can assist as potential constituents for the wide-range of natural product-based preparations and formulations currently being developed on an industrial scale. The understanding of the production methods and functions of these biomolecules will contribute to valorisation of agriculture, food bioprocessing and biopharma, and prevent human diseases related to the environment.
    • Intragenomic polymorphisms in the ITS region of high-quality genomes of the Hypoxylaceae (Xylariales, Ascomycota)

      Stadler, Marc; Lambert, Christopher; Wibberg, Daniel; Kalinowski, Jörn; Cox, Russell J.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Kuhnert, Eric; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Springer, 2020-03-01)
      The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) has been established (and is generally accepted) as a primary “universal” genetic barcode for fungi for many years, but the actual value for taxonomy has been heavily disputed among mycologists. Recently, twelve draft genome sequences, mainly derived from type species of the family Hypoxylaceae (Xylariales, Ascomycota) and the ex-epitype strain of Xylaria hypoxylon have become available during the course of a large phylogenomic study that was primarily aimed at establishing a correlation between the existing multi-gene-based genealogy with a genome-based phylogeny and the discovery of novel biosynthetic gene clusters encoding for secondary metabolites. The genome sequences were obtained using combinations of Illumina and Oxford nanopore technologies or PacBio sequencing, respectively, and resulted in high-quality sequences with an average N50 of 3.2 Mbp. While the main results will be published concurrently in a separate paper, the current case study was dedicated to the detection of ITS nrDNA copies in the genomes, in an attempt to explain certain incongruities and apparent mismatches between phenotypes and genotypes that had been observed during previous polyphasic studies. The results revealed that all of the studied strains had at least three copies of rDNA in their genomes, with Hypoxylon fragiforme having at least 19 copies of the ITS region, followed by Xylaria hypoxylon with at least 13 copies. Several of the genomes contained 2–3 copies that were nearly identical, but in some cases drastic differences, below 97% identity were observed. In one case, ascribable to the presence of a pseudogene, the deviations of the ITS sequences from the same genome resulted in only ca. 90% of overall homology. These results are discussed in the scope of the current trends to use ITS data for species recognition and segregation of fungi. We propose that additional genomes should be checked for such ITS polymorphisms to reassess the validity of this non-coding part of the fungal DNA for molecular identification.
    • Alpha-Glucosidase- and Lipase-Inhibitory Phenalenones from a New Species of Originating from Thailand.

      Macabeo, Allan Patrick G; Pilapil, Luis Agustin E; Garcia, Katherine Yasmin M; Quimque, Mark Tristan J; Phukhamsakda, Chayanard; Cruz, Allaine Jean C; Hyde, Kevin D; Stadler, Marc; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-02-20)
      The alpha-glucosidase- and lipase-inhibitory activities of three phenalenones (1-3) and one phenylpropanoid (4) from the ethyl acetate extracts of a Pseudolophiosptoma sp. are described. They represent the first secondary metabolites reported from the genus Pseudolophiostoma. Scleroderolide (1) and sclerodione (2) exhibited potent α-glucosidase- and porcine-lipase-inhibitory activity during primary screening, with better IC50 values compared to the positive controls, N-deoxynojirimycin and orlistat. In silico techniques were employed to validate the probable biological targets and elucidate the mechanism of actions of phenalenones 1 and 2. Both compounds exhibited strong binding affinities to both alpha-glucosidase and porcine lipase through H-bonding and π-π interactions. Interestingly, favorable in silico ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) properties such as gastrointestinal absorption were also predicted using software.