• Edonamides, the first secondary metabolites from the recently described myxobacterium Aggregicoccus edonensis

      Karwehl, Sabrina; Mohr, Kathrin I.; Jansen, Rolf; Sood, Sakshi; Bernecker, Steffen; Stadler, Marc; Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research,Inhoffenstr. 7; 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2015-11)
    • The Effect of Cytochalasans on the Actin Cytoskeleton of Eukaryotic Cells and Preliminary Structure⁻Activity Relationships.

      Kretz, Robin; Wendt, Lucile; Wongkanoun, Sarunyou; Luangsa-Ard, J Jennifer; Surup, Frank; Helaly, Soleiman E; Noumeur, Sara R; Stadler, Marc; Stradal, Theresia E B; HZI, Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig Germany. (MDPI, 2019-02-19)
      In our ongoing search for new bioactive fungal metabolites, two new cytochalasans were isolated from stromata of the hypoxylaceous ascomycete Hypoxylon fragiforme. Their structures were elucidated via high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Together with 23 additional cytochalasans isolated from ascomata and mycelial cultures of different Ascomycota, they were tested on their ability to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton of mammal cells in a preliminary structure⁻activity relationship study. Out of all structural features, the presence of hydroxyl group at the C7 and C18 residues, as well as their stereochemistry, were determined as important factors affecting the potential to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, reversibility of the actin disrupting effects was tested, revealing no direct correlations between potency and reversibility in the tested compound group. Since the diverse bioactivity of cytochalasans is interesting for various applications in eukaryotes, the exact effect on eukaryotic cells will need to be determined, e.g., by follow-up studies involving medicinal chemistry and by inclusion of additional natural cytochalasans. The results are also discussed in relation to previous studies in the literature, including a recent report on the anti-Biofilm activities of essentially the same panel of compounds against the pathogenic bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus.
    • The Effect of Cytochalasans on the Actin Cytoskeleton of Eukaryotic Cells and Preliminary Structure⁻Activity Relationships.

      Kretz, Robin; Wendt, Lucile; Wongkanoun, Sarunyou; Luangsa-Ard, J Jennifer; Surup, Frank; Helaly, Soleiman E; Noumeur, Sara R; Stadler, Marc; Stradal, Theresia E B; HZI, Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig Germany. (MPDI, 2019-02-19)
      In our ongoing search for new bioactive fungal metabolites, two new cytochalasans were isolated from stromata of the hypoxylaceous ascomycete Hypoxylon fragiforme. Their structures were elucidated via high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Together with 23 additional cytochalasans isolated from ascomata and mycelial cultures of different Ascomycota, they were tested on their ability to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton of mammal cells in a preliminary structure–activity relationship study. Out of all structural features, the presence of hydroxyl group at the C7 and C18 residues, as well as their stereochemistry, were determined as important factors affecting the potential to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, reversibility of the actin disrupting effects was tested, revealing no direct correlations between potency and reversibility in the tested compound group. Since the diverse bioactivity of cytochalasans is interesting for various applications in eukaryotes, the exact effect on eukaryotic cells will need to be determined, e.g., by follow-up studies involving medicinal chemistry and by inclusion of additional natural cytochalasans. The results are also discussed in relation to previous studies in the literature, including a recent report on the anti-Biofilm activities of essentially the same panel of compounds against the pathogenic bacterium, Staphylococcus aureus. View Full-Text
    • Elsinopirins A-D, Decalin Polyketides from the Ascomycete Elsinoё pyri.

      Surup, Frank; Pommerehne, Kathrin; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Stadler, Marc; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2018-02-05)
      In course of our screening for new secondary metabolites from ecological niche specialized, phytopathogenic fungi, the plant pathogenElsinoё pyri, strain 2203C, was found to produce four novel compounds (1-4), which were named elsinopirins A-D, in addition to the known metabolite elsinochrome A (5). After isolation by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), their structures, including relative stereochemistry, were elucidated by 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) data. Finally, absolute stereochemistry was assigned by chemical shifts of Mosher's esters (α-methoxy-α-trifluoromethylphenylacetic acid; MTPA) derivatives of elsinopirin B (2). The compounds were found to be devoid of significant antibacterial, antifungal, and cytotoxic activities.
    • An endothelial cell line infected by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) allows the investigation of Kaposi's sarcoma and the validation of novel viral inhibitors in vitro and in vivo.

      Dubich, Tatyana; Lieske, Anna; Santag, Susann; Beauclair, Guillaume; Rückert, Jessica; Herrmann, Jennifer; Gorges, Jan; Büsche, Guntram; Kazmaier, Uli; Hauser, Hansjörg; et al. (2019-01-04)
      Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a tumor of endothelial origin predominantly affecting immunosuppressed individuals. Up to date, vaccines and targeted therapies are not available. Screening and identification of anti-viral compounds are compromised by the lack of scalable cell culture systems reflecting properties of virus-transformed cells in patients. Further, the strict specificity of the virus for humans limits the development of in vivo models. In this study, we exploited a conditionally immortalized human endothelial cell line for establishment of in vitro 2D and 3D KSHV latency models and the generation of KS-like xenograft tumors in mice. Importantly, the invasive properties and tumor formation could be completely reverted by purging KSHV from the cells, confirming that tumor formation is dependent on the continued presence of KSHV, rather than being a consequence of irreversible transformation of the infected cells. Upon testing a library of 260 natural metabolites, we selected the compounds that induced viral loss or reduced the invasiveness of infected cells in 2D and 3D endothelial cell culture systems. The efficacy of selected compounds against KSHV-induced tumor formation was verified in the xenograft model. Together, this study shows that the combined use of anti-viral and anti-tumor assays based on the same cell line is predictive for tumor reduction in vivo and therefore allows faithful selection of novel drug candidates against Kaposi's sarcoma. KEY MESSAGES: Novel 2D, 3D, and xenograft mouse models mimic the consequences of KSHV infection. KSHV-induced tumorigenesis can be reverted upon purging the cells from the virus. A 3D invasiveness assay is predictive for tumor reduction in vivo. Chondramid B, epothilone B, and pretubulysin D diminish KS-like lesions in vivo.
    • Erinacine C Activates Transcription from a Consensus ETS DNA Binding Site in Astrocytic Cells in Addition to NGF Induction.

      Rascher, Monique; Wittstein, Kathrin; Winter, Barbara; Rupcic, Zeljka; Wolf-Asseburg, Alexandra; Stadler, Marc; Köster, Reinhard W; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (MDPI, 2020-10-14)
      Medicinal mushrooms of the genus Hericium are known to produce secondary metabolites with homeostatic properties for the central nervous system. We and others have recently demonstrated that among these metabolites cyathane diterpenoids and in particular erinacine C possess potent neurotrophin inducing properties in astrocytic cells. Yet, the signaling events downstream of erinacine C induced neurotrophin acitivity in neural-like adrenal phaeochromocytoma cells (PC12) cells have remained elusive. Similar, signaling events activated by erinacine C in astrocytic cells are unknown. Using a combination of genetic and pharmacological inhibitors we show that erinacine C induced neurotrophic activity mediates PC12 cell differentiation via the TrkA receptor and likely its associated PLCγ-, PI3K-, and MAPK/ERK pathways. Furthermore, a small library of transcriptional activation reporters revealed that erinacine C induces transcriptional activation mediated by DNA consensus binding sites of selected conserved transcription factor families. Among these, transcription is activated from an ETS consensus in a concentration dependent manner. Interestingly, induced ETS-consensus transcription occurs in parallel and independent of neurotrophin induction. This finding helps to explain the many pleiotropic functions of cyathane diterpenoids. Moreover, our studies provide genetic access to cyathane diterpenoid functions in astrocytic cells and help to mechanistically understand the action of cyathanes in glial cells.
    • Evolution of Xylariomycetidae (Ascomycota: Sordariomycetes)

      Samarakoon, MC et al.; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2016)
    • Five Unprecedented Secondary Metabolites from the Spider Parasitic Fungus Akanthomyces novoguineensis.

      Helaly, Soleiman E; Kuephadungphan, Wilawan; Phongpaichit, Souwalak; Luangsa-Ard, Janet Jennifer; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Stadler, Marc; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2017-06-14)
      Five new compounds including the glycosylated β-naphthol (1, akanthol), a glycosylated pyrazine (2, akanthozine), and three amide derivatives including a hydroxamic acid derivative (3-5) were isolated from the spider-associated fungus Akanthomyces novoguineensis (Cordycipitaceae, Ascomycota). Their structures were elucidated by using high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and NMR spectroscopy. In this study, the antimicrobial, cytotoxic, anti-biofilm, and nematicidal activities of the new compounds were evaluated. The distribution pattern of secondary metabolites in the species was also revealed in which more isolates of A. novoguineensis were encountered and their secondary metabolite profiles were examined using analytical HPLC with diode array and mass spectrometric detection (HPLC-DAD/MS). Remarkably, all isolated compounds are specifically produced by A. novoguineensis.
    • Formaldehyde as a Chemical Defence Agent of Fruiting Bodies of Mycena rosea and its Role in the Generation of the Alkaloid Mycenarubin C

      Himstedt, Rieke; Wagner, Silke; Jaeger, Robert J. R.; Lieunang Watat, Michèle‐Laure; Backenköhler, Jana; Rupcic, Zeljka; Stadler, Marc; Spiteller, Peter; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Wiley, 2020-03-13)
      Mycenarubin C, a previously unknown red pyrroloquinoline alkaloid, was isolated from fruiting bodies of the mushroom Mycena rosea and its structure was elucidated mainly by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Unlike mycenarubin A, the major pyrroloquinoline alkaloid in fruiting bodies of M. rosea, mycenarubin C, contains an eight-membered ring with an additional C1 unit that is hitherto unprecedented for pyrroloquinoline alkaloids known in nature. Incubation of mycenarubin A with an excess of formaldehyde revealed that mycenarubin C was generated nearly quantitatively from mycenarubin A. An investigation into the formaldehyde content of fresh fruiting bodies of M. rosea showed the presence of considerable amounts of formaldehyde, with values of 5 μg per gram of fresh weight in fresh fruiting bodies. Although mycenarubin C did not show bioactivity against selected bacteria and fungi, formaldehyde inhibits the growth of the mycoparasite Spinellus fusiger at concentrations present in fruiting bodies of M. rosea. Therefore, formaldehyde might play an ecological role in the chemical defence of M. rosea against S. fusiger. In turn, S. fusiger produces gallic acid-presumably to detoxify formaldehyde by reaction of this aldehyde with amino acids and gallic acid to Mannich
    • Fungal diversity notes 929–1035: taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions on genera and species of fungi

      Phookamsak, Rungtiwa; Stadler, Mark; et al.; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Springer-Nature, 2019-05-01)
      This article is the ninth in the series of Fungal Diversity Notes, where 107 taxa distributed in three phyla, nine classes, 31 orders and 57 families are described and illustrated. Taxa described in the present study include 12 new genera, 74 new species, three new combinations, two reference specimens, a re-circumscription of the epitype, and 15 records of sexual-asexual morph connections, new hosts and new geographical distributions. Twelve new genera comprise Brunneofusispora, Brunneomurispora, Liua, Lonicericola, Neoeutypella, Paratrimmatostroma, Parazalerion, Proliferophorum, Pseudoastrosphaeriellopsis, Septomelanconiella, Velebitea and Vicosamyces. Seventy-four new species are Agaricus memnonius, A. langensis, Aleurodiscus patagonicus, Amanita flavoalba, A. subtropicana, Amphisphaeria mangrovei, Baorangia major, Bartalinia kunmingensis, Brunneofusispora sinensis, Brunneomurispora lonicerae, Capronia camelliae-yunnanensis, Clavulina thindii, Coniochaeta simbalensis, Conlarium thailandense, Coprinus trigonosporus, Liua muriformis, Cyphellophora filicis, Cytospora ulmicola, Dacrymyces invisibilis, Dictyocheirospora metroxylonis, Distoseptispora thysanolaenae, Emericellopsis koreana, Galiicola baoshanensis, Hygrocybe lucida, Hypoxylon teeravasati, Hyweljonesia indica, Keissleriella caraganae, Lactarius olivaceopallidus, Lactifluus midnapurensis, Lembosia brigadeirensis, Leptosphaeria urticae, Lonicericola hyaloseptispora, Lophiotrema mucilaginosis, Marasmiellus bicoloripes, Marasmius indojasminodorus, Micropeltis phetchaburiensis, Mucor orantomantidis, Murilentithecium lonicerae, Neobambusicola brunnea, Neoeutypella baoshanensis, Neoroussoella heveae, Neosetophoma lonicerae, Ophiobolus malleolus, Parabambusicola thysanolaenae, Paratrimmatostroma kunmingensis, Parazalerion indica, Penicillium dokdoense, Peroneutypa mangrovei, Phaeosphaeria cycadis, Phanerochaete australosanguinea, Plectosphaerella kunmingensis, Plenodomus artemisiae, P. lijiangensis, Proliferophorum thailandicum, Pseudoastrosphaeriellopsis kaveriana, Pseudohelicomyces menglunicus, Pseudoplagiostoma mangiferae, Robillarda mangiferae, Roussoella elaeicola, Russula choptae, R. uttarakhandia, Septomelanconiella thailandica, Spencermartinsia acericola, Sphaerellopsis isthmospora, Thozetella lithocarpi, Trechispora echinospora, Tremellochaete atlantica, Trichoderma koreanum, T. pinicola, T. rugulosum, Velebitea chrysotexta, Vicosamyces venturisporus, Wojnowiciella kunmingensis and Zopfiella indica. Three new combinations are Baorangia rufomaculata, Lanmaoa pallidorosea and Wojnowiciella rosicola. The reference specimens of Canalisporium kenyense and Tamsiniella labiosa are designated. The epitype of Sarcopeziza sicula is re-circumscribed based on cyto- and histochemical analyses. The sexual-asexual morph connection of Plenodomus sinensis is reported from ferns and Cirsium for the first time. In addition, the new host records and country records are Amanita altipes, A. melleialba, Amarenomyces dactylidis, Chaetosphaeria panamensis, Coniella vitis, Coprinopsis kubickae, Dothiorella sarmentorum, Leptobacillium leptobactrum var. calidus, Muyocopron lithocarpi, Neoroussoella solani, Periconia cortaderiae, Phragmocamarosporium hederae, Sphaerellopsis paraphysata and Sphaeropsis eucalypticola.
    • Fungal natural products-the mushroom perspective.

      Stadler, Marc; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2015)
    • Fungi on wild seeds and fruits

      Perera, R. H.; Hyde, K. D.; Maharachchikumbura, S. S.N.; Jones, E. B.G.; McKenzie, E. H.C.; Stadler, M.; Lee, H. B.; Samarakoon, M. C.; Ekanayaka, A. H.; Camporesi, E.; et al. (Mycosphere Press, 2020-09-17)
      This paper reviews and determines the fungi growing on seeds and fruits of wild plants in various habitats. Such fungi colonise a wide range of substrates with most reported from cones, cupules, and leguminous pods that are high in cellulose and lignin content. There are 1348 fungal species (belonging to 230 families and 609 genera) reported from wild seeds and fruits in 84 countries, listed in this paper. Of these, 300 fungi were described from wild seeds and fruit substrates. Members of the Fabaceae support the highest number of taxa, namely 19% of the novel wild fruit fungi. Twenty-eight genera, including 5 fossil fungal genera have been described from wild seeds and fruits: Agarwalomyces, Amorocoelophoma, Anisogenispora, Archephoma, Centrolepidosporium, Cylindroaseptospora, Cylindromyces, Davidhawksworthia, Delonicicola, Discotubeufia, Glaxoa, Kionocephala, Leucaenicola, Naranus, Neolindgomyces, Pleohelicoon, Quercicola, Remotididymella, Repetoblastiella, Restilago, Soloacrosporiella, Strobiloscypha and Tainosphaeria. Archephoma, Meniscoideisporites, Palaeodiplodites, Palaeopericonia and Xylohyphites are the new fossil fungal genera. Fungal asexual morphs predominate on wild seeds and fruits rather than the sexual morphs. The dominant fungal genera on wild seeds and fruits include Alternaria, Aspergillus, Candida, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Colletotrichum, Curvularia, Diaporthe, Drechslera, Fusarium, Mucor, Penicillium, Pestalotiopsis, Restiosporium, Rhizopus, Talaromyces, Trichoderma and Xylaria. Certain assemblages of fungi have specific and distinct relationships with their hosts, especially Xylaria species (e.g., Xylaria magnoliae on Magnolia fruits; X. xanthinovelutina (= X. ianthino-velutina) on Fabaceae pods; X. carpophila on Fagus cupules; X. persicaria on liquidambar fruits). Whether these species occur as endophytes and become saprobes following fruit fall requires further investigation. In this study, we also made several sexual morph collections of sordariomycetous taxa from different seed and fruit substrates mainly from Thailand, with a few from the UK. These include 15 new species, 13 new host records and 1 new geographical record. The new species are described and illustrated. © 2020, Guizhou Key Laboratory of Agricultural Biotechnology
    • Furanones and Anthranilic Acid Derivatives from the Endophytic Fungus Dendrothyrium variisporum.

      Teponno, Rémy B; Noumeur, Sara R; Helaly, Soleiman E; Hüttel, Stephan; Harzallah, Daoud; Stadler, Marc; Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2017-10-09)
      Extracts from an endophytic fungus isolated from the roots of the Algerian plant Globularia alypum showed prominent antimicrobial activity in a screening for novel antibiotics. The producer organism was identified as Dendrothyrium variisporum by means of morphological studies and molecular phylogenetic methods. Studies on the secondary metabolite production of this strain in various culture media revealed that the major components from shake flasks were massarilactones D (1) and H (2) as well as two new furanone derivatives for which we propose the trivial names (5S)-cis-gregatin B (3) and graminin D (4). Scale-up of the fermentation in a 10 L bioreactor yielded massarilactone D and several further metabolites. Among those were three new anthranilic acid derivatives (5-7), two known anthranilic acid analogues (8 and 9) and three cyclopeptides (10-12). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis (1D- and 2D-NMR), high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRESIMS), and the application of the modified Mosher's method. The isolated metabolites were tested for antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities against various bacteria, fungi, and two mammalian cell lines. The new Metabolite 5 and Compound 9 exhibited antimicrobial activity while Compound 9 showed cytotoxicity activity against KB3.1 cells.
    • Fusarium: more than a node or a foot-shaped basal cell.

      Crous, P W; Lombard, L; Sandoval-Denis, M; Seifert, K A; Schroers, H-J; Chaverri, P; Gené, J; Guarro, J; Hirooka, Y; Bensch, K; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2021-08-17)
      Recent publications have argued that there are potentially serious consequences for researchers in recognising distinct genera in the terminal fusarioid clade of the family Nectriaceae. Thus, an alternate hypothesis, namely a very broad concept of the genus Fusarium was proposed. In doing so, however, a significant body of data that supports distinct genera in Nectriaceae based on morphology, biology, and phylogeny is disregarded. A DNA phylogeny based on 19 orthologous protein-coding genes was presented to support a very broad concept of Fusarium at the F1 node in Nectriaceae. Here, we demonstrate that re-analyses of this dataset show that all 19 genes support the F3 node that represents Fusarium sensu stricto as defined by F. sambucinum (sexual morph synonym Gibberella pulicaris). The backbone of the phylogeny is resolved by the concatenated alignment, but only six of the 19 genes fully support the F1 node, representing the broad circumscription of Fusarium. Furthermore, a re-analysis of the concatenated dataset revealed alternate topologies in different phylogenetic algorithms, highlighting the deep divergence and unresolved placement of various Nectriaceae lineages proposed as members of Fusarium. Species of Fusarium s. str. are characterised by Gibberella sexual morphs, asexual morphs with thin- or thick-walled macroconidia that have variously shaped apical and basal cells, and trichothecene mycotoxin production, which separates them from other fusarioid genera. Here we show that the Wollenweber concept of Fusarium presently accounts for 20 segregate genera with clear-cut synapomorphic traits, and that fusarioid macroconidia represent a character that has been gained or lost multiple times throughout Nectriaceae. Thus, the very broad circumscription of Fusarium is blurry and without apparent synapomorphies, and does not include all genera with fusarium-like macroconidia, which are spread throughout Nectriaceae (e.g., Cosmosporella, Macroconia, Microcera). In this study four new genera are introduced, along with 18 new species and 16 new combinations. These names convey information about relationships, morphology, and ecological preference that would otherwise be lost in a broader definition of Fusarium. To assist users to correctly identify fusarioid genera and species, we introduce a new online identification database, Fusarioid-ID, accessible at www.fusarium.org. The database comprises partial sequences from multiple genes commonly used to identify fusarioid taxa (act1, CaM, his3, rpb1, rpb2, tef1, tub2, ITS, and LSU). In this paper, we also present a nomenclator of names that have been introduced in Fusarium up to January 2021 as well as their current status, types, and diagnostic DNA barcode data. In this study, researchers from 46 countries, representing taxonomists, plant pathologists, medical mycologists, quarantine officials, regulatory agencies, and students, strongly support the application and use of a more precisely delimited Fusarium (= Gibberella) concept to accommodate taxa from the robust monophyletic node F3 on the basis of a well-defined and unique combination of morphological and biochemical features. This F3 node includes, among others, species of the F. fujikuroi, F. incarnatum-equiseti, F. oxysporum, and F. sambucinum species complexes, but not species of Bisifusarium [F. dimerum species complex (SC)], Cyanonectria (F. buxicola SC), Geejayessia (F. staphyleae SC), Neocosmospora (F. solani SC) or Rectifusarium (F. ventricosum SC). The present study represents the first step to generating a new online monograph of Fusarium and allied fusarioid genera (www.fusarium.org).
    • GE23077 binds to the RNA polymerase 'i' and 'i+1' sites and prevents the binding of initiating nucleotides.

      Zhang, Yu; Degen, David; Ho, Mary X; Sineva, Elena; Ebright, Katherine Y; Ebright, Yon W; Mekler, Vladimir; Vahedian-Movahed, Hanif; Feng, Yu; Yin, Ruiheng; et al. (2014)
      Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and structural approaches, we show that the cyclic-peptide antibiotic GE23077 (GE) binds directly to the bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) active-center 'i' and 'i+1' nucleotide binding sites, preventing the binding of initiating nucleotides, and thereby preventing transcription initiation. The target-based resistance spectrum for GE is unusually small, reflecting the fact that the GE binding site on RNAP includes residues of the RNAP active center that cannot be substituted without loss of RNAP activity. The GE binding site on RNAP is different from the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, GE and rifamycins do not exhibit cross-resistance, and GE and a rifamycin can bind simultaneously to RNAP. The GE binding site on RNAP is immediately adjacent to the rifamycin binding site. Accordingly, covalent linkage of GE to a rifamycin provides a bipartite inhibitor having very high potency and very low susceptibility to target-based resistance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02450.001.
    • Generic names in the Orbiliaceae (Orbiliomycetes) and recommendations on which names should be protected or suppressed

      Baral, Hans-Otto; Weber, Evi; Gams, Walter; Hagedorn, Gregor; Liu, Bin; Liu, Xingzhong; Marson, Guy; Marvanov?, Ludmila; Stadler, Marc; Weiss, Michael; et al. (2017-05-17)
    • Genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis fici reveals its lifestyle and high potential for synthesis of natural products.

      Wang, Xiuna; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Ling; Xiang, Meichun; Wang, Wenzhao; Sun, Xiang; Che, Yongsheng; Guo, Liangdong; Liu, Gang; Guo, Liyun; et al. (2015-01-27)
      BackgroundIn recent years, the genus Pestalotiopsis is receiving increasing attention, not only because of its economic impact as a plant pathogen but also as a commonly isolated endophyte which is an important source of bioactive natural products. Pestalotiopsis fici Steyaert W106-1/CGMCC3.15140 as an endophyte of tea produces numerous novel secondary metabolites, including chloropupukeananin, a derivative of chlorinated pupukeanane that is first discovered in fungi. Some of them might be important as the drug leads for future pharmaceutics.ResultsHere, we report the genome sequence of the endophytic fungus of tea Pestalotiopsis fici W106-1/CGMCC3.15140. The abundant carbohydrate-active enzymes especially significantly expanding pectinases allow the fungus to utilize the limited intercellular nutrients within the host plants, suggesting adaptation of the fungus to endophytic lifestyle. The P. fici genome encodes a rich set of secondary metabolite synthesis genes, including 27 polyketide synthases (PKSs), 12 non-ribosomal peptide synthases (NRPSs), five dimethylallyl tryptophan synthases, four putative PKS-like enzymes, 15 putative NRPS-like enzymes, 15 terpenoid synthases, seven terpenoid cyclases, seven fatty-acid synthases, and five hybrids of PKS-NRPS. The majority of these core enzymes distributed into 74 secondary metabolite clusters. The putative Diels-Alderase genes have undergone expansion.ConclusionThe significant expansion of pectinase encoding genes provides essential insights in the life strategy of endophytes, and richness of gene clusters for secondary metabolites reveals high potential of natural products of endophytic fungi.
    • Haprolid Inhibits Tumor Growth of Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Rb/E2F and Akt/mTOR Inhibition.

      Xing, Jun; Bhuria, Vikas; Bui, Khac Cuong; Nguyen, Mai Ly Thi; Hu, Zexi; Hsieh, Chih-Jen; Wittstein, Kathrin; Stadler, Marc; Wilkens, Ludwig; Li, Jun; et al. (MDPI, 2020-03-06)
      The efficacy of haprolid was evaluated in human HCC cell lines (Huh-7, Hep3B and HepG2) and xenograft tumors (NMRI-Foxn1nu mice with injection of Hep3B cells). Cytotoxic activity of haprolid was determined by the WST-1 and crystal violet assay. Wound healing, transwell and tumorsphere assays were performed to investigate migration and invasion of HCC cells. Apoptosis and cell-cycle distribution were measured by flow cytometry. The effects of haprolid on the Rb/E2F and Akt/mTOR pathway were examined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry.
    • How to publish a new fungal species, or name, version 3.0.

      Aime, M Catherine; Miller, Andrew N; Aoki, Takayuki; Bensch, Konstanze; Cai, Lei; Crous, Pedro W; Hawksworth, David L; Hyde, Kevin D; Kirk, Paul M; Lücking, Robert; et al. (BMC, 2021-05-03)
      It is now a decade since The International Commission on the Taxonomy of Fungi (ICTF) produced an overview of requirements and best practices for describing a new fungal species. In the meantime the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants (ICNafp) has changed from its former name (the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature) and introduced new formal requirements for valid publication of species scientific names, including the separation of provisions specific to Fungi and organisms treated as fungi in a new Chapter F. Equally transformative have been changes in the data collection, data dissemination, and analytical tools available to mycologists. This paper provides an updated and expanded discussion of current publication requirements along with best practices for the description of new fungal species and publication of new names and for improving accessibility of their associated metadata that have developed over the last 10 years. Additionally, we provide: (1) model papers for different fungal groups and circumstances; (2) a checklist to simplify meeting (i) the requirements of the ICNafp to ensure the effective, valid and legitimate publication of names of new taxa, and (ii) minimally accepted standards for description; and, (3) templates for preparing standardized species descriptions.
    • Hybridorubrins A-D, novel azaphilone heterodimers from stromata of Hypoxylon fragiforme and insights into the biosynthetic machinery for azaphilone diversification.

      Becker, Kevin; Pfütze, Sebastian; Kuhnert, Eric; Cox, Russell; Stadler, Marc; Surup, Frank; HZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (Wiley-VCH, 2020-08-04)
      The diversity of azaphilones in stromatal extracts of the fungus Hypoxylon fragiforme was investigated and linked to their biosynthetic machineries using bioinformatics. Nineteen azaphilone-type compounds were isolated and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, with their absolute stereoconfigurations assigned using Mosher ester analysis and ECD spectroscopy. Four unprecedented bisazaphilones, named hybridorubrins A-D ( 1 - 4 ), were elucidated, in addition to new fragirubrins F-G ( 5 - 6 ) and various known mitorubrin derivatives. Only the hybridorubrins, which are composed of mitorubrin and fragirubrin moieties, exhibited strong inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation. Analysis of the genome of H. fragiforme revealed the presence of two separate biosynthetic gene clusters (BGC) hfaza1 and hfaza2 responsible for azaphilone formation. While the hfaza1 BGC likely encodes the assembly of the backbone and addition of fatty acid moieties to yield the ( R )-configured series of fragirubrins, the hfaza2 BGC contains the necessary genes to synthesise the widely distributed ( S )-mitorubrins. This study is the first example of two distant cross-acting fungal BGC collaborating to produce two families of azaphilones and bisazaphilones derived thereof.