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dc.contributor.authorMüsken, Mathias
dc.contributor.authorKlimmek, Kathi
dc.contributor.authorSauer-Heilborn, Annette
dc.contributor.authorDonnert, Monique
dc.contributor.authorSedlacek, Ludwig
dc.contributor.authorSuerbaum, Sebastian
dc.contributor.authorHäussler, Susanne
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-08T09:06:27Z
dc.date.available2017-11-08T09:06:27Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationTowards individualized diagnostics of biofilm-associated infections: a case study. 2017, 3:22 NPJ Biofilms Microbiomesen
dc.identifier.issn2055-5008
dc.identifier.pmidPMC5620081
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41522-017-0030-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/621169
dc.description.abstractOrganized within biofilm communities, bacteria exhibit resistance towards a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Thus, one might argue that bacteria isolated from biofilm-associated chronic infections should be subjected to resistance profiling under biofilm growth conditions. Various test systems have been developed to determine the biofilm-associated resistance; however, it is not clear to what extent the in vitro results reflect the situation in vivo, and whether the biofilm-resistance profile should guide clinicians in their treatment choice. To address this issue, we used confocal microscopy in combination with live/dead staining, and profiled biofilm-associated resistance of a large number (>130) of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from overall 15 cystic fibrosis patients. Our results demonstrate that in addition to a general non-responsiveness of bacteria when grown under biofilm conditions, there is an isolate-specific and antibiotic-specific biofilm-resistance profile. This individual resistance profile is independent on the structural properties of the biofilms. Furthermore, biofilm resistance is not linked to the resistance profile under planktonic growth conditions, or a mucoid, or small colony morphology of the tested isolates. Instead, it seems that individual biofilm structures evolve during biofilm-associated growth and are shaped by environment-specific cues. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that biofilm resistance profiles are isolate specific and cannot be deduced from commonly studied phenotypes. Further clinical studies will have to show the added value of biofilm-resistance profiling. Individualized diagnosis of biofilm resistance might lead to more rational recommendations for antimicrobial therapy and, thus, increased effectiveness of the treatment of chronically infected patients.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleTowards individualized diagnostics of biofilm-associated infections: a case study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentH-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr.7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en
dc.identifier.journalNPJ biofilms and microbiomesen
dc.identifier.pmcidhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5620081/pdf/41522_2017_Article_30.pdf
refterms.dateFOA2018-06-13T01:11:51Z
html.description.abstractOrganized within biofilm communities, bacteria exhibit resistance towards a broad spectrum of antibiotics. Thus, one might argue that bacteria isolated from biofilm-associated chronic infections should be subjected to resistance profiling under biofilm growth conditions. Various test systems have been developed to determine the biofilm-associated resistance; however, it is not clear to what extent the in vitro results reflect the situation in vivo, and whether the biofilm-resistance profile should guide clinicians in their treatment choice. To address this issue, we used confocal microscopy in combination with live/dead staining, and profiled biofilm-associated resistance of a large number (>130) of clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from overall 15 cystic fibrosis patients. Our results demonstrate that in addition to a general non-responsiveness of bacteria when grown under biofilm conditions, there is an isolate-specific and antibiotic-specific biofilm-resistance profile. This individual resistance profile is independent on the structural properties of the biofilms. Furthermore, biofilm resistance is not linked to the resistance profile under planktonic growth conditions, or a mucoid, or small colony morphology of the tested isolates. Instead, it seems that individual biofilm structures evolve during biofilm-associated growth and are shaped by environment-specific cues. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that biofilm resistance profiles are isolate specific and cannot be deduced from commonly studied phenotypes. Further clinical studies will have to show the added value of biofilm-resistance profiling. Individualized diagnosis of biofilm resistance might lead to more rational recommendations for antimicrobial therapy and, thus, increased effectiveness of the treatment of chronically infected patients.


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