• Analysis of bacterial communities in a municipal duck pond during a phytoplankton bloom and isolation of Anatilimnocola aggregata gen. nov., sp. nov., Lacipirellula limnantheis sp. nov. and Urbifossiella limnaea gen. nov., sp. nov. belonging to the phylum Planctomycetes.

      Kallscheuer, Nicolai; Rast, Patrick; Jogler, Mareike; Wiegand, Sandra; Kohn, Timo; Boedeker, Christian; Jeske, Olga; Heuer, Anja; Quast, Christian; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; et al. (Wiley & Sond Ltd., 2021-01-12)
      Waterbodies such as lakes and ponds are fragile environments affected by human influences. Suitable conditions can result in massive growth of phototrophs, commonly referred to as phytoplankton blooms. Such events benefit heterotrophic bacteria able to use compounds secreted by phototrophs or their biomass as major nutrient source. One example of such bacteria are Planctomycetes, which are abundant on the surfaces of marine macroscopic phototrophs; however, less data are available on their ecological roles in limnic environments. In this study, we followed a cultivation-independent deep sequencing approach to study the bacterial community composition during a cyanobacterial bloom event in a municipal duck pond. In addition to cyanobacteria, which caused the bloom event, members of the phylum Planctomycetes were significantly enriched in the cyanobacteria-attached fraction compared to the free-living fraction. Separate datasets based on isolated DNA and RNA point towards considerable differences in the abundance and activity of planctomycetal families, indicating different activity peaks of these families during the cyanobacterial bloom. Motivated by the finding that the sampling location harbours untapped bacterial diversity, we included a complementary cultivation-dependent approach and isolated and characterized three novel limnic strains belonging to the phylum Planctomycetes.
    • Coprinuslactone protects the edible mushroom Coprinus comatus against biofilm infections by blocking both quorum-sensing and MurA.

      de Carvalho, Maira P; Gulotta, Giuseppe; do Amaral, Matheus W; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Sasse, Florenz; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Helmholtz Centre for infection research, Inhoffenstr. 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2016-10-03)
      Pathogens embedded in biofilms are involved in many infections and are very difficult to treat with antibiotics because of higher resistance compared to planktonic cells. Therefore, new approaches for their control are urgently needed. One way to search for biofilm dispersing compounds is to look at defense strategies of organisms exposed to wet environments, which makes them prone to biofilm infections. It is reasonable to assume that mushrooms have developed mechanisms to control biofilms on their sporocarps (fruiting bodies). A preliminary screening for biofilms on sporocarps revealed several species with few or no bacteria on their sporocarps. From the edible mushroom Coprinus comatus where no bacteria on the sporocarp could be detected (3R,4S)-2-methylene-3,4-dihydroxypentanoic acid 1,4-lactone, named coprinuslactone, was isolated. Coprinuslactone interfered with quorum-sensing and dispersed biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, where it also reduced the formation of the pathogenicity factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid B. Coprinuslactone also damaged Staphylococcus aureus cells in biofilms at subtoxic concentrations. Furthermore, it inhibited UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvyl transferase (MurA), essential for bacterial cell wall synthesis. These two modes of action ensure the inhibition of a broad spectrum of pathogens on the fruiting body but may also be useful for future clinical applications. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    • A novel protein quality control mechanism contributes to heat shock resistance of worldwide-distributed Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C strains.

      Lee, Changhan; Wigren, Edvard; Trček, Janja; Peters, Verena; Kim, Jihong; Hasni, Muhammad Sharif; Nimtz, Manfred; Lindqvist, Ylva; Park, Chankyu; Curth, Ute; et al. (2015-11)
      Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly successful nosocomial pathogen capable of causing a wide variety of infections with clone C strains most prevalent worldwide. In this study, we initially characterize a molecular mechanism of survival unique to clone C strains. We identified a P. aeruginosa clone C-specific genomic island (PACGI-1) that contains the highly expressed small heat shock protein sHsp20c, the founding member of a novel subclass of class B bacterial small heat shock proteins. sHsp20c and adjacent gene products are involved in resistance against heat shock. Heat stable sHsp20c is unconventionally expressed in stationary phase in a wide temperature range from 20 to 42°C. Purified sHsp20c has characteristic features of small heat shock protein class B as it is monodisperse, forms sphere-like 24-meric oligomers and exhibits significant chaperone activity. As the P. aeruginosa clone C population is significantly more heat shock resistant than genetically unrelated P. aeruginosa strains without sHsp20c, the horizontally acquired shsp20c operon might contribute to the survival of worldwide-distributed clone C strains.