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dc.contributor.authorMenni, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorHernandez, Marisa Matey
dc.contributor.authorVital, Marius
dc.contributor.authorMohney, Robert P
dc.contributor.authorSpector, Tim D
dc.contributor.authorValdes, Ana M
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-14T09:32:34Z
dc.date.available2019-06-14T09:32:34Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-29
dc.identifier.citationGut Microbes. 2019 Apr 29:1-8. doi: 10.1080/19490976.2019.1586038.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1949-0984
dc.identifier.pmid31030641
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19490976.2019.1586038
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/621817
dc.description.abstractThe gut microbiome has recently emerged as an important regulator of insulin resistance and abdominal obesity. The tryptophan metabolite generated by the gut microbiome, indoleproprionic acid (IPA) has been shown to predict the onset of type 2 diabetes. IPA is a metabolite produced by gut microbes from dietary tryptophan that exhibits a high degree of inter-individual variation. The microbiome composition parameters that are associated with circulating levels of this potent anti-oxidant have however not been investigated to date in human populations. In 1018 middle-aged women from the TwinsUK cohort, we assessed the relationship between serum IPA levels and gut microbiome composition targeting the 16S rRNA gene. Microbiome alpha-diversity was positively correlated with serum indoleproprionic acid levels (Shannon Diversity: Beta[95%CI] = 0.19[0.13;0.25], P = 6.41 × 10-10) after adjustment for covariates. Sixteen taxa and 12 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) associated with IPA serum levels. Among these are positive correlations with the butyrate-producing Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, the class Mollicutes and the order RF39 of the Tenericutes, and Coprococcus Negative correlations instead were observed with Eubacterium dolichum previously shown to correlate with visceral fat mass and several genera in the Lachnospiraceae family such as Blautia and Ruminococcus previously shown to correlate with obesity. Microbiome composition parameters explained ~20% of the variation in circulating levels of IPA, whereas nutritional and host genetic parameters explained only ~4%. Our data confirm an association between IPA circulating levels and metabolic syndrome parameters and indicate that gut microbiome composition influences IPA levels.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectIndoleproprionateen_US
dc.subjectmetabolic syndromeen_US
dc.subjectmicrobiome diversityen_US
dc.titleCirculating levels of the anti-oxidant indoleproprionic acid are associated with higher gut microbiome diversity.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en_US
dc.identifier.journalGut Microbesen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-06-14T09:32:35Z
dc.source.journaltitleGut microbes


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