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dc.contributor.authorCollias, Daphne
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, Ryan
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Scott P.
dc.contributor.authorBeisel, Chase L.
dc.contributor.authorNoireaux, Vincent
dc.creatorCollias, D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-14T11:44:55Z
dc.date.available2020-02-14T11:44:55Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-21
dc.identifier.issn19397267
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/synbio/ysz005
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?partnerID=HzOxMe3b&scp=85065856447&origin=inward
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/622134
dc.description.abstractWithin the last 6 years, CRISPR-Cas systems have transitioned from adaptive defense systems in bacteria and archaea to revolutionary genome-editing tools. The resulting CRISPR technologies have driven innovations for treating genetic diseases and eradicating human pests while raising societal questions about gene editing in human germline cells as well as crop plants. Bringing CRISPR into the classroom therefore offers a means to expose students to cutting edge technologies and to promote discussions about ethical questions at the intersection of science and society. However, working with these technologies in a classroom setting has been difficult because typical experiments rely on cellular systems such as bacteria or mammalian cells. We recently reported the use of an E. coli cell-free transcription-translation (TXTL) system that simplifies the demonstration and testing of CRISPR technologies with shorter experiments and limited equipment. Here, we describe three educational modules intended to expose undergraduate students to CRISPR technologies using TXTL. The three sequential modules comprise (i) designing the RNAs that guide DNA targeting, (ii) measuring DNA cleavage activity in TXTL and (iii) testing how mutations to the targeting sequence or RNA backbone impact DNA binding and cleavage. The modules include detailed protocols, questions for group discussions or individual evaluation, and lecture slides to introduce CRISPR and TXTL. We expect these modules to allow students to experience the power and promise of CRISPR technologies in the classroom and to engage with their instructor and peers about the opportunities and potential risks for society.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOxford Academicen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSynthetic Biology
dc.relation.ispartofseries1en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectCas9en_US
dc.subjectCRISPRen_US
dc.subjecteducation modulesen_US
dc.subjectsynthetic biologyen_US
dc.subjectTXTLen_US
dc.titleAn educational module to explore CRISPR technologies with a cell-free transcription-translation systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHIRI, Helmholtz-Institut für RNA-basierte Infektionsforschung, Josef-Shneider Strasse 2, 97080 Würzburg, Germany.en_US
dc.identifier.journalSynthetic Biologyen_US
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85065856447
dc.identifier.scopusidSCOPUS_ID:85065856447
dc.relation.volume4
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-14T11:44:56Z


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