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dc.contributor.authorGrüneboom, Anika
dc.contributor.authorHawwari, Ibrahim
dc.contributor.authorWeidner, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorCulemann, Stephan
dc.contributor.authorMüller, Sylvia
dc.contributor.authorHenneberg, Sophie
dc.contributor.authorBrenzel, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorMerz, Simon
dc.contributor.authorBornemann, Lea
dc.contributor.authorZec, Kristina
dc.contributor.authorWuelling, Manuela
dc.contributor.authorKling, Lasse
dc.contributor.authorHasenberg, Mike
dc.contributor.authorVoortmann, Sylvia
dc.contributor.authorLang, Stefanie
dc.contributor.authorBaum, Wolfgang
dc.contributor.authorOhs, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorKraff, Oliver
dc.contributor.authorQuick, Harald H
dc.contributor.authorJäger, Marcus
dc.contributor.authorLandgraeber, Stefan
dc.contributor.authorDudda, Marcel
dc.contributor.authorDanuser, Renzo
dc.contributor.authorStein, Jens V
dc.contributor.authorRohde, Manfred
dc.contributor.authorGelse, Kolja
dc.contributor.authorGarbe, Annette I
dc.contributor.authorAdamczyk, Alexandra
dc.contributor.authorWestendorf, Astrid M
dc.contributor.authorHoffmann, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorChristiansen, Silke
dc.contributor.authorEngel, Daniel Robert
dc.contributor.authorVortkamp, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorKrönke, Gerhard
dc.contributor.authorHerrmann, Martin
dc.contributor.authorKamradt, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorSchett, Georg
dc.contributor.authorHasenberg, Anja
dc.contributor.authorGunzer, Matthias
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-18T14:39:36Z
dc.date.available2020-08-18T14:39:36Z
dc.date.issued2019-01-21
dc.identifier.citationNat Metab. 2019;1(2):236-250. doi:10.1038/s42255-018-0016-5.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid31620676
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s42255-018-0016-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/622414
dc.description.abstractClosed circulatory systems (CCS) underlie the function of vertebrate organs, but in long bones their structure is unclear, although they constitute the exit route for bone marrow (BM) leukocytes. To understand neutrophil emigration from BM, we studied the vascular system of murine long bones. Here we show that hundreds of capillaries originate in BM, cross murine cortical bone perpendicularly along the shaft and connect to the periosteal circulation. Structures similar to these trans-cortical-vessels (TCVs) also exist in human limb bones. TCVs express arterial or venous markers and transport neutrophils. Furthermore, over 80% arterial and 59% venous blood passes through TCVs. Genetic and drug-mediated modulation of osteoclast count and activity leads to substantial changes in TCV numbers. In a murine model of chronic arthritic bone inflammation, new TCVs develop within weeks. Our data indicate that TCVs are a central component of the CCS in long bones and may represent an important route for immune cell export from the BM.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNature publishing group(NPG)en_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleA network of trans-cortical capillaries as mainstay for blood circulation in long bones.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn2522-5812
dc.contributor.departmentHZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en_US
dc.identifier.journalNature metabolismen_US
dc.source.volume1
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage236
dc.source.endpage250
refterms.dateFOA2020-08-18T14:39:36Z
dc.source.journaltitleNature metabolism
dc.source.countryInternational
dc.source.countryGermany


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