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dc.contributor.authorZou, Mangge
dc.contributor.authorYang, Juhao
dc.contributor.authorWiechers, Carolin
dc.contributor.authorHuehn, Jochen
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-27T13:32:21Z
dc.date.available2020-10-27T13:32:21Z
dc.date.issued2020-06-19
dc.identifier.citationEur J Microbiol Immunol (Bp). 2020 Jun 19;10(2):98–106. doi: 10.1556/1886.2020.00007.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2062-509X
dc.identifier.pmid32644940
dc.identifier.doi10.1556/1886.2020.00007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/622540
dc.description.abstractListeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a food-borne pathogen with a high chance of infecting neonates, pregnant women, elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Lm infection in neonates can cause neonatal meningitis and sepsis with a high risk of severe neurological and developmental sequelae and high mortality rates. However, whether an acute neonatal Lm infection causes long-term effects on the immune system persisting until adulthood has not been fully elucidated. Here, we established a neonatal Lm infection model and monitored the composition of major immune cell subsets at defined time points post infection (p.i.) in secondary lymphoid organs and the intestine. Twelve weeks p.i., the CD8+ T cell population was decreased in colon and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs) with an opposing increase in the spleen. In the colon, we observed an accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ effector/memory T cells with an increase of T-bet+ T helper 1 (Th1) cells. In addition, 12 weeks p.i. an altered composition of innate lymphoid cell (ILC) and dendritic cell (DC) subsets was still observed in colon and mLNs, respectively. Together, these findings highlight organ-specific long-term consequences of an acute neonatal Lm infection on both the adaptive and innate immune system.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAkadémiai Kiadóen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectimmune systemen_US
dc.subjectlisteria monocytogenesen_US
dc.subjectlong-term consequencesen_US
dc.subjectneonatal infectionen_US
dc.subjectorgan-specificen_US
dc.titleAcute neonatal Listeria monocytogenes infection causes long-term, organ-specific changes in immune cell subset composition.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentHZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en_US
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of microbiology & immunologyen_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-10-27T13:32:21Z
dc.source.journaltitleEuropean journal of microbiology & immunology
dc.source.countryHungary


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