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dc.contributor.authorZöllkau, Janine
dc.contributor.authorPieper, Dietmar H
dc.contributor.authorPastuschek, Jana
dc.contributor.authorMakarewicz, Oliwia
dc.contributor.authorMentzel, Hans-Joachim
dc.contributor.authorDawczynski, Kristin
dc.contributor.authorSchleußner, Ekkehard
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-04T15:39:47Z
dc.date.available2021-02-04T15:39:47Z
dc.date.issued2020-12-18
dc.identifier.citationZ Geburtshilfe Neonatol. 2020 Dec 18. English. doi: 10.1055/a-1326-2719. Epub ahead of print.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid33339061
dc.identifier.doi10.1055/a-1326-2719
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/622716
dc.description.abstractA primiparous pregnant woman was admitted due to preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) at 27+0 week of gestational age (WGA). Conventional vaginal microbiological analysis had no pathological finding. Management decisions based on national guidelines included antenatal corticoids, tocolytics and antibiotics. Unstoppable efforts of preterm labor in 28+0 WGA and supposed amniotic infection syndrome necessitated emergency cesarean section. The preterm infant underwent NICU therapy, developed an early-onset neonatal sepsis and therapy-refractory pulmonary insufficiency with consecutive right heart failure, resulting in death on the 36th day of life. Microbiota analyses by 16Sr DNA sequencing was performed from maternal vaginal swabs and from neonatal pharyngeal swabs. Maternal antibiotic treatment resulted in depletion of physiological vaginal colonization with Lactobacillus crispatus. Ureaplasma parvum became the dominant vaginal microorganism at delivery and was detected in high relative abundance in the neonatal specimen. Progressive radiological air-space changes and interstitial pathologies associated with Ureaplasma infection (bronchopulmonary dysplasia type III) were seen early at the 3rd and distinctly from 14th day of life. This clearly demonstrates the need of vaginal colonization diagnostics in PPROM patients and awareness of the consecutive risks in the preterm. Vaginal microbiome analysis may allow individualized and targeted maternal and fetal diagnostic, prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to identify, protect and treat the high-risk neonates after PPROM.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThieme Verlagen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.titleLethal Neonatal Respiratory Failure by Perinatal Transmission of Ureaplasma Parvum after Maternal PPROM.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1439-1651
dc.contributor.departmentHZI,Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Inhoffenstr. 7,38124 Braunschweig, Germany.en_US
dc.identifier.journalZeitschrift fur Geburtshilfe und Neonatologieen_US
dc.source.journaltitleZeitschrift fur Geburtshilfe und Neonatologie
dc.source.countryGermany


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