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dc.contributor.authorSchütte, Kerstin
dc.contributor.authorSchulz, Christian
dc.contributor.authorVilchez-Vargas, Ramiro
dc.contributor.authorVasapolli, Riccardo
dc.contributor.authorPalm, Frederike
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Bianca
dc.contributor.authorSchomburg, Dirk
dc.contributor.authorLux, Anke
dc.contributor.authorGeffers, Robert
dc.contributor.authorPieper, Dietmar H
dc.contributor.authorLink, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorMalfertheiner, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-20T13:04:17Z
dc.date.available2021-10-20T13:04:17Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-30
dc.identifier.citationGut Microbes. 2021 Jan-Dec;13(1):1966261. doi: 10.1080/19490976.2021.1966261.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid34455919
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19490976.2021.1966261
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/623077
dc.description.abstractThe adaption of gut microbiota (GM) throughout human life is a key factor in maintaining health. Interventions to restore a healthy GM composition may have the potential to improve health and disease outcomes in the elderly. We performed a comprehensive characterization of changes in the luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota composition in elderly compared with younger healthy individuals. Samples from saliva and feces, and biopsies from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract (UGIT, LGIT), were collected from 59 asymptomatic individuals grouped by age: 40-55, 56-70, and 71-85 years). All underwent anthropometric, geriatric, and nutritional assessment. RNA was extracted and reverse-transcribed into complementary DNA; the V1-V2 regions of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified and sequenced. Abundances of the taxa in all taxonomic ranks in each sample type were used to construct sample-similarity matrices by the Bray-Curtis algorithm. Significant differences between defined groups were assessed by analysis of similarity. The bacterial community showed strong interindividual variations and a clear distinction between samples from UGIT, LGIT, and feces. While in saliva some taxa were affected by aging, this number was considerably greater in UGIT and was subsequently higher in LGIT. Unexpectedly, aging scarcely influenced the bacterial community of feces over the age range of 40-85 years. The development of interventions to preserve and restore human health with increased age by establishing a healthy gut microbiome should not rely solely on data from fecal analysis, as the intestinal mucosa is affected by more significant changes, which differ from those observed in fecal analyses.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen_US
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectHealthy agingen_US
dc.subjectgut microbiotaen_US
dc.subjectmicrobiomeen_US
dc.subjectnutritionen_US
dc.subjectphysical fitnessen_US
dc.titleImpact of healthy aging on active bacterial assemblages throughout the gastrointestinal tract.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1949-0984
dc.contributor.departmentHIRI, Helmholtz-Institut für RNA-basierte Infektionsforschung, Josef-Shneider Strasse 2, 97080 Würzburg, Germany.en_US
dc.identifier.journalGut microbesen_US
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage1966261
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2021-10-20T13:04:17Z
dc.source.journaltitleGut microbes
dc.source.countryUnited States


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