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dc.contributor.authorSaleh, Reem
dc.contributor.authorSasidharan Nair, Varun
dc.contributor.authorToor, Salman M.
dc.contributor.authorElkord, Eyad
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-10T08:52:24Z
dc.date.available2022-05-10T08:52:24Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-27
dc.identifier.citationReem Saleh, Varun Sasidharan Nair, Salman M. Toor, Eyad Elkord, Chapter Fourteen - Intrinsic and acquired cancer immunotherapy resistance, Editor(s): Mansoor M. Amiji, Lara Scheherazade Milane, Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, Academic Press, 2022, Pages 463-497, ISBN 9780128233979, https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-823397-9.00014-4. (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128233979000144) Abstract: Cancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), have revolutionized the treatment of various cancers and have shown a great efficacy in inducing antitumor immunity. Cancer immunotherapy in the form of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) have also been developed to eradicate tumor cells in a specific and effective manner, and it includes the administration of autologous tumor-infiltrating T-cells (TILs), T-cell receptor (TCR)-modified T-cells, or genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-specific T-cells (CARTs) in cancer patients. Additionally, cancer vaccines and recombinant cytokines can be used as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy. Despite the success of immunotherapies in treating various solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, a significant number of patients do not benefit from these therapies and exhibit limited or no response. Some cancer patients do not respond to immunotherapies as a result of primary or intrinsic tumor resistance, while others respond to immunotherapies but develop resistance over time, referred to as adaptive or acquired tumor resistance. Tumor intrinsic- and extrinsic-mediated mechanisms, including genetic and epigenetic alterations, tumor-mutational loads, overexpression of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints, and elevated levels of suppressive immune cells and cytokines, can lead to a compromised antitumor immunity favoring tumorigenesis and cancer progression. This chapter outlines mechanisms of intrinsic tumor resistance and the emergence of acquired tumor resistance to cancer immunotherapies. Moreover, this chapter describes combined cancer immunotherapies, which may offer a great therapeutic potential to overcome tumor resistance against therapy and improve clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Keywords: Cancer; Immunotherapy; Immune checkpoint inhibitor; Adoptive T-cell therapy; Tumor microenvironment; Intrinsic resistance; Acquired resistance; Epigenetics; Therapeutic strategiesen_US
dc.identifier.isbn978-0-12823397-9
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/B978-0-12-823397-9.00014-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10033/623190
dc.descriptionCancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), have revolutionized the treatment of various cancers and have shown a great efficacy in inducing antitumor immunity. Cancer immunotherapy in the form of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) have also been developed to eradicate tumor cells in a specific and effective manner, and it includes the administration of autologous tumor-infiltrating T-cells (TILs), T-cell receptor (TCR)-modified T-cells, or genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-specific T-cells (CARTs) in cancer patients. Additionally, cancer vaccines and recombinant cytokines can be used as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy. Despite the success of immunotherapies in treating various solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, a significant number of patients do not benefit from these therapies and exhibit limited or no response. Some cancer patients do not respond to immunotherapies as a result of primary or intrinsic tumor resistance, while others respond to immunotherapies but develop resistance over time, referred to as adaptive or acquired tumor resistance. Tumor intrinsic- and extrinsic-mediated mechanisms, including genetic and epigenetic alterations, tumor-mutational loads, overexpression of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints, and elevated levels of suppressive immune cells and cytokines, can lead to a compromised antitumor immunity favoring tumorigenesis and cancer progression. This chapter outlines mechanisms of intrinsic tumor resistance and the emergence of acquired tumor resistance to cancer immunotherapies. Moreover, this chapter describes combined cancer immunotherapies, which may offer a great therapeutic potential to overcome tumor resistance against therapy and improve clinical outcomes in cancer patients. +é(c) 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserveden_US
dc.description.abstractCancer immunotherapies, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), have revolutionized the treatment of various cancers and have shown a great efficacy in inducing antitumor immunity. Cancer immunotherapy in the form of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) have also been developed to eradicate tumor cells in a specific and effective manner, and it includes the administration of autologous tumor-infiltrating T-cells (TILs), T-cell receptor (TCR)-modified T-cells, or genetically engineered chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-specific T-cells (CARTs) in cancer patients. Additionally, cancer vaccines and recombinant cytokines can be used as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy. Despite the success of immunotherapies in treating various solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, a significant number of patients do not benefit from these therapies and exhibit limited or no response. Some cancer patients do not respond to immunotherapies as a result of primary or intrinsic tumor resistance, while others respond to immunotherapies but develop resistance over time, referred to as adaptive or acquired tumor resistance. Tumor intrinsic- and extrinsic-mediated mechanisms, including genetic and epigenetic alterations, tumor-mutational loads, overexpression of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints, and elevated levels of suppressive immune cells and cytokines, can lead to a compromised antitumor immunity favoring tumorigenesis and cancer progression. This chapter outlines mechanisms of intrinsic tumor resistance and the emergence of acquired tumor resistance to cancer immunotherapies. Moreover, this chapter describes combined cancer immunotherapies, which may offer a great therapeutic potential to overcome tumor resistance against therapy and improve clinical outcomes in cancer patients. +é(c) 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserveden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128233979000144?via%3Dihuben_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectAcquired resistanceen_US
dc.subjectAdoptive T-cell therapyen_US
dc.subjectCanceren_US
dc.subjectEpigeneticsen_US
dc.subjectImmune checkpoint inhibitoren_US
dc.subjectImmunotherapyen_US
dc.subjectIntrinsic resistanceen_US
dc.subjectTherapeutic strategiesen_US
dc.subjectTumor microenvironmenten_US
dc.titleIntrinsic and acquired cancer immunotherapy resistanceen_US
dc.typeBook chapteren_US
dc.contributor.departmentSir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; Cancer Research Center, Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI), Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU), Qatar Foundation (QF), Doha, Qatar;Department of Experimental Immunology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Biomedical Research Center, School of Science, Engineering and Environment, University of Salford, Manchester, United Kingdom; College of Health and Life Sciences (CHLS), Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU), Doha, Qatar;Natural and Medical Sciences Research Center, University of Nizwa, Nizwa, Omanen_US
dc.identifier.journalCancer Immunology and Immunotherapy: Volume 1 of Delivery Strategies and Engineering Technologies in Cancer Immunotherapyen_US
dc.identifier.eid2-s2.0-85127689292
dc.identifier.scopusidSCOPUS_ID:85127689292
dc.source.beginpage463
dc.source.endpage497
dc.source.journaltitleCancer Immunology and Immunotherapy: Volume 1 of Delivery Strategies and Engineering Technologies in Cancer Immunotherapy


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