• Kinome analysis of receptor-induced phosphorylation in human natural killer cells.

      König, Sebastian; Nimtz, Manfred; Scheiter, Maxi; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Bryceson, Yenan T; Jänsch, Lothar; Department of Molecular Structural Biology, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung, Braunschweig, Germany. (2012)
      Natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the defense against infected and transformed cells through the engagement of multiple germline-encoded activation receptors. Stimulation of the Fc receptor CD16 alone is sufficient for NK cell activation, whereas other receptors, such as 2B4 (CD244) and DNAM-1 (CD226), act synergistically. After receptor engagement, protein kinases play a major role in signaling networks controlling NK cell effector functions. However, it has not been characterized systematically which of all kinases encoded by the human genome (kinome) are involved in NK cell activation.
    • Myelin 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: active-site ligand binding and molecular conformation.

      Myllykoski, Matti; Raasakka, Arne; Han, Huijong; Kursula, Petri; Department of Biochemistry and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. (2012)
      The 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) is a highly abundant membrane-associated enzyme in the myelin sheath of the vertebrate nervous system. CNPase is a member of the 2H phosphoesterase family and catalyzes the formation of 2'-nucleotide products from 2',3'-cyclic substrates; however, its physiological substrate and function remain unknown. It is likely that CNPase participates in RNA metabolism in the myelinating cell. We solved crystal structures of the phosphodiesterase domain of mouse CNPase, showing the binding mode of nucleotide ligands in the active site. The binding mode of the product 2'-AMP provides a detailed view of the reaction mechanism. Comparisons of CNPase crystal structures highlight flexible loops, which could play roles in substrate recognition; large differences in the active-site vicinity are observed when comparing more distant members of the 2H family. We also studied the full-length CNPase, showing its N-terminal domain is involved in RNA binding and dimerization. Our results provide a detailed picture of the CNPase active site during its catalytic cycle, and suggest a specific function for the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain.
    • Raver1 is an integral component of muscle contractile elements.

      Zieseniss, Anke; Schroeder, Ulrich; Buchmeier, Sabine; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; van den Heuvel, Joop; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Illenberger, Susanne; Cell Biology, Zoological Institute, Technical University of Braunschweig, Biocentre, Spielmannstrasse 7, 38092 Braunschweig, Germany. (2007-03)
      Raver1, a ubiquitously expressed protein, was originally identified as a ligand for metavinculin, the muscle-specific isoform of the microfilament-associated protein vinculin. The protein resides primarily in the nucleus, where it colocalises and may interact with polypyrimidine-tract-binding protein, which is involved in alternative splicing processes. During skeletal muscle differentiation, raver1 translocates to the cytoplasm and eventually targets the Z-line of sarcomeres. Here, it colocalises with metavinculin, vinculin and alpha-actinin, all of which have biochemically been identified as raver1 ligands. To obtain more information about the potential role of raver1 in muscle structure and function, we have investigated its distribution and fine localisation in mouse striated and smooth muscle, by using three monoclonal antibodies that recognise epitopes in different regions of the raver1 protein. Our immunofluorescence and immunoelectron-microscopic results indicate that the cytoplasmic accumulation of raver1 is not confined to skeletal muscle but also occurs in heart and smooth muscle. Unlike vinculin and metavinculin, cytoplasmic raver1 is not restricted to costameres but additionally represents an integral part of the sarcomere. In isolated myofibrils and in ultrathin sections of skeletal muscle, raver1 has been found concentrated at the I-Z-I band. A minor fraction of raver1 is present in the nuclei of all three types of muscle. These data indicate that, during muscle differentiation, raver1 might link gene expression with structural functions of the contractile machinery of muscle.
    • Structure of the dimeric autoinhibited conformation of DAPK2, a pro-apoptotic protein kinase.

      Patel, Ashok K; Yadav, Ravi P; Majava, Viivi; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri (2011-06-10)
      The death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family has been characterized as a group of pro-apoptotic serine/threonine kinases that share specific structural features in their catalytic kinase domain. Two of the DAPK family members, DAPK1 and DAPK2, are calmodulin-dependent protein kinases that are regulated by oligomerization, calmodulin binding, and autophosphorylation. In this study, we have determined the crystal and solution structures of murine DAPK2 in the presence of the autoinhibitory domain, with and without bound nucleotides in the active site. The crystal structure shows dimers of DAPK2 in a conformation that is not permissible for protein substrate binding. Two different conformations were seen in the active site upon the introduction of nucleotide ligands. The monomeric and dimeric forms of DAPK2 were further analyzed for solution structure, and the results indicate that the dimers of DAPK2 are indeed formed through the association of two apposed catalytic domains, as seen in the crystal structure. The structures can be further used to build a model for DAPK2 autophosphorylation and to compare with closely related kinases, of which especially DAPK1 is an actively studied drug target. Our structures also provide a model for both homodimerization and heterodimerization of the catalytic domain between members of the DAPK family. The fingerprint of the DAPK family, the basic loop, plays a central role in the dimerization of the kinase domain.
    • Total synthesis and biological evaluation of (-)-pectinatone employing a methyl-branched wax ester as key building block.

      Galeyeva, Yana; Helbig, Sarah; Morr, Michael; Sasse, Florenz; Nimtz, Manfred; Laschat, Sabine; Baro, Angelika; Institut für Organische Chemie, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, D-70569 Stuttgart. (2006-08)
      Unnatural (-)-pectinatone ((-)-3) was prepared in five steps starting from the highly methyl-branched wax ester 4, employing bromination of the ester enolate and subsequent base-induced elimination to the enoate 6 as the key step. Both (-)-3 and the amides 8b and 8c, which were isolated as by-products in the reaction sequence, displayed antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity.