• Raver1 is an integral component of muscle contractile elements.

      Zieseniss, Anke; Schroeder, Ulrich; Buchmeier, Sabine; Schoenenberger, Cora-Ann; van den Heuvel, Joop; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Illenberger, Susanne; Cell Biology, Zoological Institute, Technical University of Braunschweig, Biocentre, Spielmannstrasse 7, 38092 Braunschweig, Germany. (2007-03)
      Raver1, a ubiquitously expressed protein, was originally identified as a ligand for metavinculin, the muscle-specific isoform of the microfilament-associated protein vinculin. The protein resides primarily in the nucleus, where it colocalises and may interact with polypyrimidine-tract-binding protein, which is involved in alternative splicing processes. During skeletal muscle differentiation, raver1 translocates to the cytoplasm and eventually targets the Z-line of sarcomeres. Here, it colocalises with metavinculin, vinculin and alpha-actinin, all of which have biochemically been identified as raver1 ligands. To obtain more information about the potential role of raver1 in muscle structure and function, we have investigated its distribution and fine localisation in mouse striated and smooth muscle, by using three monoclonal antibodies that recognise epitopes in different regions of the raver1 protein. Our immunofluorescence and immunoelectron-microscopic results indicate that the cytoplasmic accumulation of raver1 is not confined to skeletal muscle but also occurs in heart and smooth muscle. Unlike vinculin and metavinculin, cytoplasmic raver1 is not restricted to costameres but additionally represents an integral part of the sarcomere. In isolated myofibrils and in ultrathin sections of skeletal muscle, raver1 has been found concentrated at the I-Z-I band. A minor fraction of raver1 is present in the nuclei of all three types of muscle. These data indicate that, during muscle differentiation, raver1 might link gene expression with structural functions of the contractile machinery of muscle.
    • Streamlining homogeneous glycoprotein production for biophysical and structural applications by targeted cell line development.

      Wilke, Sonja; Groebe, Lothar; Maffenbeier, Vitali; Jäger, Volker; Gossen, Manfred; Josewski, Jörn; Duda, Agathe; Polle, Lilia; Owens, Raymond J; Wirth, Dagmar; et al. (2011)
      Studying the biophysical characteristics of glycosylated proteins and solving their three-dimensional structures requires homogeneous recombinant protein of high quality.We introduce here a new approach to produce glycoproteins in homogenous form with the well-established, glycosylation mutant CHO Lec3.2.8.1 cells. Using preparative cell sorting, stable, high-expressing GFP 'master' cell lines were generated that can be converted fast and reliably by targeted integration via Flp recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) to produce any glycoprotein. Small-scale transient transfection of HEK293 cells was used to identify genetically engineered constructs suitable for constructing stable cell lines. Stable cell lines expressing 10 different proteins were established. The system was validated by expression, purification, deglycosylation and crystallization of the heavily glycosylated luminal domains of lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP).
    • Structure of the human receptor tyrosine kinase met in complex with the Listeria invasion protein InlB.

      Niemann, Hartmut H; Jäger, Volker; Butler, P Jonathan G; van den Heuvel, Joop; Schmidt, Sabine; Ferraris, Davide; Gherardi, Ermanno; Heinz, Dirk W; Division of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Inhoffenstrasse 7, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2007-07-27)
      The tyrosine kinase Met, the product of the c-met proto-oncogene and the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), mediates signals critical for cell survival and migration. The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes exploits Met signaling for invasion of host cells via its surface protein InlB. We present the crystal structure of the complex between a large fragment of the human Met ectodomain and the Met-binding domain of InlB. The concave face of the InlB leucine-rich repeat region interacts tightly with the first immunoglobulin-like domain of the Met stalk, a domain which does not bind HGF/SF. A second contact between InlB and the Met Sema domain locks the otherwise flexible receptor in a rigid, signaling competent conformation. Full Met activation requires the additional C-terminal domains of InlB which induce heparin-mediated receptor clustering and potent signaling. Thus, although it elicits a similar cellular response, InlB is not a structural mimic of HGF/SF.
    • Structure of the type III secretion recognition protein YscU from Yersinia enterocolitica.

      Wiesand, Ulrich; Sorg, Isabel; Amstutz, Marlise; Wagner, Stefanie; van den Heuvel, Joop; Lührs, Thorsten; Cornelis, Guy R; Heinz, Dirk W; Division of Structural Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Inhoffenstrasse 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany. (2009-01-23)
      The inner-membrane protein YscU has an important role during the assembly of the Yersinia enterocolitica type III secretion injectisome. Its cytoplasmic domain (YscU(C)) recognizes translocators as individual substrates in the export hierarchy. Activation of YscU entails autocleavage at a conserved NPTH motif. Modification of this motif markedly changes the properties of YscU, including translocator export cessation and production of longer injectisome needles. We determined the crystal structures of the uncleaved variants N263A and N263D of YscU(C) at 2.05 A and 1.55 A resolution, respectively. The globular domain is found to consist of a central, mixed beta-sheet surrounded by alpha-helices. The NPTH motif forms a type II beta-turn connecting two beta-strands. NMR analysis of cleaved and uncleaved YscU(C) indicates that the global structure of the protein is retained in cleaved YscU(C). The structure of YscU(C) variant N263D reveals that wild type YscU(C) is poised for cleavage due to an optimal reaction geometry for nucleophilic attack of the scissile bond by the side chain of Asn263. In vivo analysis of N263Q and H266A/R314A YscU variants showed a phenotype that combines the absence of translocator secretion with normal needle-length control. Comparing the structure of YscU to those of related proteins reveals that the linker domain between the N-terminal transmembrane domain and the autocleavage domain can switch from an extended to a largely alpha-helical conformation, allowing for optimal positioning of the autocleavage domain during injectisome assembly.